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  • Title: GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: .. Home.. About GenARDIS.. 2008 GenARDIS.. 2005 Winners.. News and Interviews.. Knowledge Sharing.. GenARDIS Administrating Partner.. Women's Networking Support Programme.. www.. apcwomen.. org.. Association for Progressive Communications.. apc.. GenARDIS Partners.. Centre Technique de Coopération Agricole.. et Rurale ACP-UE / Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation.. ACP-EU.. cta.. int.. International Research Development Centre / Centre.. de recherches pour le développement international.. idrc.. ca.. Humanist Institute for Cooperation with Developing Countries.. hivos.. International Institute for Communication and Development.. iicd.. GenARDIS Contact.. genardis AT apcwomen.. org.. Language.. English.. French.. User login.. Log in using OpenID:.. What is OpenID?.. Username:.. *.. Password:.. Request new password.. Log in using OpenID.. Cancel OpenID login.. Who's online.. There are currently.. 0 users.. and.. 6 guests.. online.. GenARDIS 2002 - 2010 Des petites subventions qui ont transformé la vie des femmes en agriculture.. Publié par.. APC.. Ce livre a été produit avec le soutien du Centre de recherches en développement international (.. CRDI.. ), Canada.. Login.. to post comments.. 1 attachment.. GenARDIS 2002 - 2010 Small grants that made big changes for women in agriculture.. The Gender, Agriculture and Rural Development in the Information Society (GenARDIS) small grants programme has been awarding grants to support work at the grassroots level on gender-related issues in ICTs for agricultural and rural development since 2002.. The geographic focus is African, Caribbean and Pacific regions.. This book tells the story of the GenARDIS journey thus far, provides lessons learned, stories from grantees and recommendations for policy makers.. It shows how the project facilitates local capacity building in ICTs to empower women and gives grassroots initiatives the kick-start they need to bring about economic empowerment in their communities.. As David Dolly, based at the University of the West Indies, St.. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, GenARDIS grantee 2005 and jury member 2008, says:.. The GenARDIS projects provided numerous practical insights regarding how ICTs can promote successful gendered outcomes for livelihoods, food security and food sovereignty.. Read more.. GenARDIS grantee wins Africa Rural Connect contest.. January 18, 2011.. Uganda.. In 2008-2009, Ugandan organisation Toro Development Network (ToroDev) was awarded a small grant through the APC s.. Gender and agriculture and rural development in the information society.. (GenARIDS) project.. No more than a year later, the grass roots organisation has been awarded $12, 000 through the.. Africa Rural Connect contest.. , to continue its work in helping small-scale rural farmers many of which are women learn to use technologies such as mobile phones, radios and computers.. ToroDev s award-winning project focusses on building the capacity of small-scale maize farmers in one of Uganda s poorest regions.. Petites subventions, grands chagements pour les femmes rurales.. September 20, 2010.. Une Éthiopienne apprend à utiliser la technologie.. L’accès aux nouvelles technologies de l’information et de la communication (.. TIC.. ) touche autant les hommes que les femmes qui vivent dans des régions éloignées.. Pour les gouvernements et le secteur des télécommunications, les infrastructures dans les régions rurales ne sont pas prioritaires car la population y est généralement pauvre et dispersée.. Le déploiement des infrastructures et la formation se limitent aux zones urbaines où la population est concentrée et où les profits sont immédiats et fiables.. Mais pour les femmes qui vivent en milieu rural, l’accès aux.. permet de surmonter les nombreux obstacles liés non seulement à l’endroit où elles habitent mais également à des facteurs sexospécifiques.. Sept recommandations  ...   that they often work long hours, leaving little time for learning how to use new technologies.. Yet, access to new technologies affect both men and women in remote areas.. In a new publication, GenARDIS 2002 – 2010: Small grants that made big changes for women in agriculture Jenny Radloff explores how seed grants that were disbursed to innovative initiative.. -.. Access to new information and communications technologies (ICTs) affects both men and women living in remote areas.. Governments and the telecommunications sector do not prioritise infrastructure in rural areas because the population is generally poor and dispersed.. Seven policy tips to ensure rural women equal access to ICTs.. United States.. Telecentre in Uvira, DRC:.. Men and women in Uvira,.. , working in a new telecentre.. Illiteracy, lack of electricity and poor infrastructure are just some of the challenges that are preventing rural women from benefiting from ICTs.. But these gender-related challenges are often overlooked by policy makers, and policies that are developed that don’t consider the specific context of rural men and women are more likely to fail, as they will not meet the needs of everyone equally.. This is why the inclusion of gender must be considered in the policy process.. What exactly can local and national policy makers do in order to address some of these issues? Policy analyst Sonia Jorge gives some insights.. From an equity perspective, the most basic.. policy goal should be to increase affordable access to ICTs for all women and men, regardless of geographic location, language, age, race and social class.. La fin de la troisième édition des petites subventions GenARDIS pour les femmes rurales.. E.. GenARDIS round III.. n mars, les récipiendaires des subventions de GenARDIS se sont retrouvés pour la dernière fois après plus d’un an de recherche innovatrice et de travail pour améliorer la vie des femmes rurales dans des pays comme l’Ethiopie, la République dominicaine et la Zambie.. Les projets étaient aussi variés que les pays dans lesquels ils étaient réalisés allant des groupes de théâtre radiophonique, au contrôle des animaux nuisibles grâce à l’accès aux informations en passant par l’utilisation de la technologie pour promouvoir l’héritage des femmes et leurs droits à la terre.. Mais alors que cette troisième édition arrive à sa fin, les participants sont déterminés à étendre la portée de leur travail.. Pourquoi GenARDIS?.. GenARDIS est pour la sourde en Ethiopie qui peut à présent produire ses propres revenus à l’aide de la photographie numérique.. The end of GenARDIS small grants for rural women round III.. JOHAESBURG.. GenARDIS round III:.. Photo taken of grantees at the final workshop in Johannesburg, South Africa during the knowledge sharing workshop.. March 2010.. In March GenARDIS grant winners met for the last time after more than a year of innovative research and work to improve rural women s lives in countries like Ethiopia, the Dominican Republic and Zambia.. With projects as diverse as community radio drama groups, pest control through information access and using technology to promote women’s inheritance and land rights, projects were as diverse as the countries they came from.. But as this third round of small grants winds down, participants are determined to scale up their work.. Why GenARDIS?.. GenARDIS is for the deaf woman in Ethiopia who can now generate her own income through digital photography.. 1.. 2.. 3.. 4.. 5.. next ›.. last »..

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  • Title: GenARDIS Round 3 | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: GenARDIS Evaluation Report released in 2007.. An evaluation to assess the achievements of the GenARDIS grants during Phase I and Phase II was carried out with grantees and honorable.. mentions in 2006.. It found that GenARDIS small grants are making important inroads in the ICT for development field in African,.. Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) countries and consciously encourage and engender the adoption and application of ICT.. Download the.. report summary (pdf, 417 kb).. , including key recommendations, or the.. entire report (pdf, 3.. 2 mb).. GenARDIS Round 3.. GenARDIS is a Small Grants Fund to address Gender Issues in Information and Communication Technologies for Agricultural and Rural Development in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP Countries).. “This prize will be of great help to us in building our capacity to promote the rights of women farmers through the demystification of new information and communication technologies (new ICTs), and through gender advocacy.. This prize will have a real impact on our support activities for women farmers in the sectors of agriculture, breeding, handicrafts, and in helping them to learn about their rights via their literacy efforts.. Such capacity building will increase our usefulness to other women, and to our entire community.. ”.. -- Campaign to support and build awareness of rural women of Uvira about the promotion of ICTs for gender advocacy.. Democratic Republic of the Congo.. “Cell phones are only available to 30 out of every 1000 Basotho.. It is a luxury good for poor families.. The GENardis project, will make the cellular phone an indispensable piece of  ...   that hinder women’s access to ICTs, limited time availability to participate in training and use of ICTs, minimal access to technology such as radios, mobile telephones or computers, and inadequate availability of information in local languages that is relevant to local contexts.. Submissions consist of research programmes, training courses, publications, broadcasts, theatre productions, promotion materials, etc.. – whatever need could be addressed by the means available to the many creative grant applicants.. All projects focus on innovative use of ICTs by or for rural women to improve the well-being of their families and communities.. Two rounds of grants have been offered since the fund came into being.. The response to both rounds has been overwhelming.. In 2005, more than 310 submissions were received in a period of two months.. This is a clear indication that there still is a real need for support in the field of ‘gender and agriculture in the information society’.. Challenges of the Digital Divide.. A 'digital divide' exists not only between the North and the South, between urban and rural areas, but also between men and women.. Gender disparities mean that the opportunities offered by ICTs are not immediately available to the poorest of the poor - who are mostly women.. Rural women in ACP countries face important constraints and challenges with respect to ICTs.. These include:.. * limited time availability to participate in training and use of ICTs.. * minimal access to technology such as radios, mobile telephones or computers.. * inadequate availability of information in local languages that is relevant to local contexts..

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  • Title: Announcing the short-listed candidates for GenARDIS round 3 | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: The problem statement.. The strategic use of ICTs in development initiatives holds tremendous potential for improving rural livelihoods.. However, unless gender is consciously addressed in the design and implementation of such initiatives, well-intentioned projects may only exacerbate existing gender issues.. This challenge may be attributed to a “digital divide” between women and men that adversely affect women, who make up the majority of the rural poor in developing countries.. Compared to men, rural women in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) regions are much less able to access new technologies, as they are generally less educated and hold less economic and political power than men.. Women, who typically shoulder greater responsibility for children and the elderly, find it more difficult to migrate to towns and cities than men.. The urban bias in connectivity thus disproportionately deprives women of the universal right to communicate.. While women make up the majority of people in rural areas of developing countries and play a central role in agriculture, issues of language, literacy, etc.. are compounded by their already heavy workload that limits the time available to use modern ICTs, and by cultural attitudes that prevent them from visiting public access points mostly frequented by men.. Other important challenges include limited time availability to participate in training and use of ICTs, and lack of awareness of the opportunities available.. In recognition of the dilemma between a potentially powerful set of tools – ICTs – and their failure to reach the majority of the poor in ACP countries – rural women - CTA, IDRC, IICD and Hivos invite proposals to the GenARDIS Small Grants Fund to support innovative activities that contribute to the understanding of gender issues in ICTs and to the gender-sensitive application of ICTs in ACP agricultural and rural development.. What we mean by gender.. Gender is the term used to refer to the socially constructed relations between women and men in a particular society.. These relations, and the roles women and men may assume, are culturally and institutionally embedded.. Biological sex refers to being male or female; gender as a social identity changes over time (historically) and space (geographically).. Therefore the gender roles of men or women in one society may differ from those in another, and they may differ even within one society, depending on other socio-economic criteria.. The concept of gender recognises that women and men are not homogeneous groups.. Differences in age, class, race and ethnicity, and disability status cut across human society and affect status, power and access to resources.. Our definition of ICTs.. The widely used acronym “ICTs” (information and communication technologies) encompasses a multitude of equipment, software and services.. ICTs can be interpreted broadly as technologies that facilitate communication and the processing and transmission of information by electronic means.. This definition encompasses the full range of ICTs, from radio and television to telephones (fixed and mobile), computers and the internet.. In development contexts, the interface with traditional communications systems and tools is also important, as are applications  ...   do away with intermediaries, gain access to information, improve natural resource management and influence national policies.. They also reflect the vision and hope that these twenty short-listed candidates have for gender equality and rural development.. Congratulations to the short-listed GenARDIS round 3 candidates!.. See full listing.. A Small Grants Fund to address Gender Issues in Information and Communication Technologies for Agricultural and Rural Development in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP Countries).. The International Development Research Centre (IDRC), The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA), the Humanist Institute for Cooperation with Developing Countries (Hivos), the International Institute for Communication and Development (IICD) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) called for applications for 15 small grnats of 7000 Euro in May.. Short-listed projects were announced in August.. Final selection will occur in October, 2008.. The third phase of GenARDIS grants follows two rounds of the implementation of successful projects and an in depth external evaluation.. Round 3 will involve a deeper focus on capacity-building, knowledge-sharing and policy outputs.. It aims to sustain and deepen the integration of gender perspectives into rural development and ICT4D initiatives, taking into account developments such as web 2.. 0 in agriculture and rural development and Free and Open Source Software solutions (FOSS).. GenARDIS Round 3 examines.. Understanding gender differences in the use of ICTs.. Promoting ICT use among rural women (sensitisation).. Improving rural women’s access to ICTs.. Improving the skills and capacities of rural women in using ICTs.. Increasing the attractiveness of ICTs for rural women by providing relevant content.. Using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) applications.. Submissions will be judged according to the following criteria:.. Innovativeness.. Clearly outlines and addresses gender issues, i.. e.. , the socially constructed relations between women and men in a particular society.. ICT-enabled.. Agricultural or agro-linked rural development context.. Proposal clearly states objectives, includes a methodology/ implementation strategy, identifies outputs, partners/stakeholders and includes a time line and budget.. Realistic within budgetary and time constraints.. Use of Free and Open Source (FOSS) applications.. Candidates must be available for the five-day workshop in mid-July 2008.. Costs to be covered by the GenARDIS partners.. Process.. GenARDIS round 3 will short-list twenty (20) candidates.. Short-listed candidates will be invited to participate in a five-day kick-off workshop in 2008.. The workshop will provide training in Gender Evaluation Methodology for Internet and ICTs (GEM) and capacity-building mechanisms to refine the design of projects and incorporate judges’ comments.. Short-listed candidates will resubmit their proposals for judges to select fifteen (15) successful projects.. GenARDIS Small Grants Fund grantees will have one year to implement their projects.. Interim reports and consistent peer-to-peer sharing during project implementation will be facilitated.. Participation in an end-of project knowledge-sharing workshop (mid 2009) will enable grantees to share outcomes as well as to discuss best practices and lessons learned.. Successful applicants will be expected to write a comprehensive report on their project results, experiences and use of the funds and contribute to a workshop to be held in mid 2009..

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  • Title: 2005 GenARDIS Small Grant Winners | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: 2005 Honorable Mentions.. Warning.. : Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in.. /var/www/aa-2.. 11/include/pagecache.. php3.. on line.. 329.. What do GenARDIS grantees recommend to policy makers?.. Today, everyone is aware that equitable and sustainable development cannot take place without the involvement of women throughout the process.. As a result, policy-makers can improve the situation of rural women with regard to ICTs by creating an institutional environment that promotes ICT development and electrification of rural settlements.. Policy makers could also encourage and finance the development of national language software with the possibility of translating it into other languages.. With this software, women could be inspired by successful development experiences in agriculture.. -Adama Compaoré, Association MANEGDBZANGA.. Burkina Faso.. Government action must, after the soon to be completed electoral process, draft and implement a good NICT policy in favour of rural development through the involvement of peasant women, who are in  ...   for rural development.. c) -Establish and implement legal framework in ICT for rural development to facilitate activities of government and non-government institutions.. -Collins Osei, CRI - Crops Research Institute.. Ghana.. There is a need for Kenya to move faster to implement the just developed ICT policy so as to address the above divide and the vulnerable position of women in ICT access, affordability, attractiveness and utilization.. -James Onyango, Executive Director of KAIPPG, KAIPPG (Kenya AIDS Intervention Prevention Project Group) [http://www.. kaippg.. org].. Kenya.. Women in Agriculture need special attention and considerations if they are to successfully use ICT's in support of their agricultural occupations.. Women in Agriculture need special training in order to benefit from the use of ICT's which can be of use in their production and processing operations.. -David Dolly, University of the West Indies.. Trinidad Tobago.. 2005 GenARDIS Small Grant Winners.. No item found..

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  • Title: GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Photo Gallery @ APC WNSP Flickr.. more GenARDIS photos.. The project has increased the women s sale shares by increasing support for.. training from men in the community, and linking the women directly to potential buyers in urban markets by using mobile phones, thus avoiding middlemen.. Founder and executive director, Johnstone Baguma, told.. Voice of America.. “As Toro Development Network, we are planning to continue with this project, especially hoping that farmers who are mainly involved in maize growing, how we can help them improve on their production, how they can be able to market their produce because they have been heavily exploited.. The GenARDIS seed grants certainly helped put this project into action, but it is the dedication of the winning organisations that make the GenARDIS project such a powerful one.. Read more about the.. ToroDev s project.. More about.. Genardis.. Genre, agriculture et TIC : Ce que l’on peut faire avec 7000 euros.. Taïguey de la République Dominicaine.. Dans la région d’Uvira, en République du Congo, les cultures de racines de manioc des femmes se faisaient détruire par des parasites, mais grâce à une formation en internet, elles ont pu accroître leur production de culture saine et leur connaissances en agriculture.. En République Dominicaine, les femmes d’une coopérative agroalimentaire ont appris à mieux gérer leur production grâce à une formation en.. – plusieurs d’entre elles avaient plus de 50 ans, ce qui est considéré comme étant “vielle” et “bonne à rien” par les standards dominicains.. Apprenez-en plus sur ce que les projets GenARDIS ont pu accomplir avec des petites subventions d’environ 7000 euros.. Recherche internet apporte des solutions aux maladies des cultures.. , République démocratique du Congo (.. RDC.. Les producteurs de racines de manioc de la région d’Uvira, en.. , ont reçu une formation sur l’utilisation du téléphone mobile pour contacter des acheteurs potentiels, ce qui leur fait économiser des déplacements coûteux jusqu’au marché.. Dans la région frontalière d’Uvira en.. , les cultures de racines de manioc des femmes étaient détruites par des parasites.. Pour aider les femmes de cette communauté à augmenter leur production saine et leurs connaissances, l’.. leur a montré comment faire des recherches sur l’internet pour connaître les maladies qui touchaient leurs récoltes.. Les femmes ont aussi reçu un téléphone mobile pour qu’elles puissent communiquer avec des acheteurs potentiels, et 48 femmes et 18 hommes de neuf groupes de femmes de la région ont appris à se servir de la technologie.. Une émission de radio hebdomadaire (« La voix de l’agricultrice ») a également été créée et des sujets sur le genre et l’agriculture y sont abordés.. Grâce à leurs nouvelles connaissances et à l’accès à la technologie, les femmes rurales d’Uvira ont vu leur production et leur revenu familial augmenter.. L’augmentation du revenu familial a permis d’acheter de meilleurs outils, une meilleure éducation pour leurs enfants et une meilleure nutrition pour elles-mêmes et leur famille.. Alors que certains hommes se sont montrés jaloux du nouveau pouvoir économique des femmes et ont résisté, d’autres ont bien accueilli ces changements et contribuent au travail à la maison.. Par cette initiative, les femmes d’Uvira ont gagné le respect de leur famille et de leur communauté.. Les.. aident des agricultrices dominicaines à mieux gérer leur coopérative.. Fundación Taigüey, République dominicaine.. La Ciénaga est un petit village de la République dominicaine où 75% des habitants vivent en-dessous du seuil de pauvreté.. Avec l’aide de la Fundación Taigüey, les femmes ont mis sur pied une coopérative agroalimentaire.. GenARDIS a financé la composante.. de cette initiative qui visait à les aider à gérer leur coopérative.. Seize femmes du conseil de la coopérative ont suivi une formation sur les outils nécessaires pour gérer la coopérative.. Bon nombre d’entre elles avaient 50 ans, c’est-à-dire qu’elles étaient « vieilles » et « plus bonnes à rien » selon les normes du monde rural de ce pays.. La plupart n’ayant pas fini l’école primaire, le personnel de la Taigüey a décidé de commencer par le commencement : on leur a enseigné les mathématiques pour qu’elles comprennent la logique d’outils comme les feuilles de travail.. Grâce à la composante.. , la majorité d’entre elles n’a plus peur des ordinateurs.. Les responsables de la coopérative se sont rendues en Uruguay pour partager leur expérience avec une coopérative du même genre.. Avant de prendre l’avion pour la première fois, elles ont pris part à une téléconférence et ont rencontré leurs homologues uruguayennes.. Ce premier échange a facilité les rapports en personne.. Le principal enseignement de cette expérience est que les.. n’apportent pas le développement par elles-mêmes.. Elles doivent être intégrées à des initiatives plus larges et plus inclusives qu’elles contribuent à accélérer et à rendre plus efficaces.. taiguey.. Photo par Fundacion Taïguey.. Une coopérative de femmes de La Ciénaga, en République dominicaine, récolte des fruits pour faire des confitures écologiques.. Les femmes ont accès à un centre de.. où elles apprennent à se servir d’outils pour gérer leurs activités.. Que peuvent faire les décideurs locaux et nationaux pour résoudre certains de ces problèmes? L’analyste de politique Sonia Jorge offre quelques pistes de réflexion.. Dans une perspective d’équité, le premier objectif d’une politique de.. devrait être de permettre aux femmes et aux hommes d’accéder aux.. de façon abordable, quels que soient le lieu, la langue, l’âge, la race et la classe sociale.. Mais les décideurs s’intéressent rarement aux questions de genre.. Et les politiques qui négligent le contexte particulier de la vie des femmes et des hommes sont plus susceptibles d’échouer car elles ne répondent pas équitablement aux besoins de tous.. C’est pourquoi l’inclusion de la dimension genre est essentielle et doit être intégrée dans le processus de formulation de la politique.. Les preuves abondent sur l’impact considérable de l’analyse du genre dans le travail de développement.. C’est sur ces preuves, et sur l’expérience de plusieurs projets de.. dans le monde, que repose l’analyse de genre dans la politique et la planification des.. L’expérience des récipiendaires et des projets de GenARDIS montre qu’il reste encore beaucoup à faire au niveau des politiques et de la planification pour que les.. offrent les mêmes possibilités et avantages aux femmes et aux hommes dans les zones rurales.. Elle souligne aussi la nécessité de formuler des politiques intersectorielles ciblées et coordonnées qui visent à améliorer la vie des femmes et des hommes dans les zones rurales.. Les recommandations suivantes sont le résultat des expériences des récipiendaires et des projets de GenARDIS et devraient être prises en compte pour orienter le projet lui-même, mais surtout pour orienter la politique nationale aux niveaux de la région et des pays.. En fait, ces recommandations peuvent jeter les bases d’un programme de plaidoyer pour les politiques ciblant plus précisément une politique d’accès universel et de développement rural sensible au genre.. Améliorer et étendre les infrastructures rurales en privilégiant les installations d’accès publiques communes, et en particulier les technologies sans fil et les sources d’électricité nécessaires.. La politique devrait prévoir la création et l’application d’un fonds d’accès universel pour promouvoir et soutenir le déploiement des technologies sans fil et les infrastructures dans les régions rurales et éloignées, en coordination avec les fournisseurs d’électricité.. Investir dans l’accès communautaire (p.. ex.. les télécentres) dans les régions rurales.. La logique de l’accès communautaire est évidente d’un point de vue économique et social.. Il offre un accès abordable sans les frais de propriété et établit un cadre communautaire pour créer des programmes de formation et des services de soutien nécessaires, dont un bon nombre devant cibler les besoins des femmes et des filles dans les communautés rurales.. On constate également que les projets de type télécentre en milieu rural contribuent à garder les jeunes dans la région.. Préparer et mettre en œuvre une campagne d’éducation sur l’égalité de genre et les droits des femmes dans le contexte des.. pour le développement.. Il est essentiel que les.. ne deviennent pas la cause de conflits et de violences fondés sur le genre.. Il faut continuer de sensibiliser la population aux droits des femmes et à l’égalité de genre.. Promouvoir et soutenir le développement des contenus locaux dans les langues locales.. Il faut avoir des contenus locaux et adaptés pour créer la demande et un marché pour les services et les applications de.. Ils peuvent contribuer à renforcer les capacités locales et/ou soutenir les entreprises locales qui s’intéressent au développement de contenus destinés à leurs communautés et qui sont diffusés par les réseaux de.. , dont la radio.. Soutenir les programmes d’alphabétisation des adultes dans les régions rurales.. La politique et les institutions de.. devraient promouvoir et soutenir les efforts d’éducation de la population et en particulier des femmes dans les régions rurales.. Promouvoir et faciliter la création de partenariats publics-privés pour la réalisation de projets ruraux, à la fois dans un but financier et pour le soutien opérationnel et à la mise en oeuvre.. Ces partenariats peuvent être conclus avec des entreprises locales ou nationales, y compris celles qui offrent un soutien technique, avec des coopératives rurales, y compris les coopératives de femmes, ainsi que d’autres entreprises locales qui savent rejoindre les utilisateurs.. Développer un programme par lequel les parlementaires et les institutions de l’État sponsorisent des projets ruraux de.. pour faire connaître leurs réussites et obtenir un soutien politique.. Les projets de.. et d’infrastructures sont très présents dans les programmes de développement gouvernementaux et permettent une plus grande visibilité et un soutien garanti pour assurer le succès du projet.. Sonia Jorge est une consultante internationale en politique de communication et de régulation, et genre et développement.. Elle travaille surtout sur les politiques et la régulation dans des pays en développement.. Cet article a été tiré de la publication.. GenARDIS 2002 2010 : Des petites subventions qui ont transformé la vie des femmes en agriculture.. , une collection du travail des gagnants GenARDIS au fil des années, et évalue l impacte que les fonds a eu sur la vie des hommes et femmes ruraux.. Photo par gagnant GenARDIS, IFDAP.. Les femmes jouent un rôle essentiel dans l’économie agricole, d’où de longues heures de travail qui laissent peu de temps pour se familiariser avec les nouvelles technologies.. Les femmes ne peuvent pas migrer aussi facilement que les hommes vers les villes où la formation aux nouvelles technologies est plus facile à obtenir.. Outre la production agricole, ce sont les femmes plutôt que les hommes qui doivent s’occuper des enfants et des personnes âgées.. Dans de nombreuses communautés, les attitudes culturelles interdisent aux femmes de se rendre dans les points d’accès publics, souvent parce qu’ils sont fréquentés par des hommes ou parce que les femmes ne sont pas autorisées à sortir de la maison sans être accompagnées d’un homme.. Les filles et les femmes ont généralement un niveau d’instruction inférieur et ne sont pas encouragées à faire des études, en particulier dans les domaines techniques.. Dans la plupart des communautés rurales, les femmes ont beaucoup moins de pouvoir politique et économique que les hommes.. Les différents éléments des.. – logiciels, claviers, information en ligne et ressources de formation – n’existent pas dans les langues locales.. Et la plupart des aspects des nouvelles technologies ne sont pas culturellement intuitifs.. Même la radio (et de plus en plus le téléphone mobile), sans doute un des moyens de communication les plus présents dans de nombreuses régions rurales, est souvent inaccessible aux femmes.. Les hommes décident des émissions à écouter et possèdent généralement la radio et le téléphone mobile.. Tout cela finit par créer des obstacles nombreux et considérables qui limitent la capacité des femmes rurales à exploiter les nouvelles technologies dans leur vie quotidienne et à consulter des informations vitales diffusées par les.. : des informations susceptibles d’influer sur la production agricole, la fluctuation des prix, les pensions et les allocations familiales, l’accès aux nouvelles sur les changements politiques pouvant les toucher directement, ainsi que les services de santé et de soutien.. Le parti pris en faveur des zones urbaines et des hommes en matière de connectivité prive de nombreuses femmes rurales, plus que les hommes, du droit universel et fondamental de communiquer.. Les responsables des programmes de développement qui visent la sécurité agricole et alimentaire se sont rendu compte il y a déjà longtemps que la centralisation des.. offre un potentiel énorme d’amélioration des modes de subsistance ruraux.. Ils se sont également rendu compte que leur succès repose sur une conception et une mise en oeuvre des projets sensibles au genre.. L’accès aux technologies peut améliorer la vie des femmes et des hommes en milieu rural.. En faisant concrètement la preuve de l’énorme contribution des femmes à l’agriculture, au revenu familial et à l’amélioration du niveau de vie, les relations de genre s’améliorent et le rôle des femmes dans la communauté est valorisé.. Le programme de petites subventions pour le Genre, l’agriculture, le développement rural et la société de l’information (GenARDIS) a été lancé en 2002 pour participer à la prise en charge des questions de genre liées à l’application des technologies de l’information et de la communication pour le développement agricole et rural dans les pays d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique.. GenARDIS tient compte des contraintes et des difficultés que connaissent les femmes rurales et a accordé des petites subventions à des projets divers et innovateurs afin de surmonter ces obstacles, documenter le processus et les résultats et contribuer à un plaidoyer sur les politiques de.. qui soit plus sensible au genre.. GenARDIS a appuyé des projets aussi variés que les pays dans lesquels ils étaient réalisés.. Au cours des années, GenARDIS a dégagé des enseignements de projets allant de groupes de théâtre radiophonique de femmes au contrôle des animaux nuisibles grâce à l’accès aux informations en passant par l’utilisation de la technologie pour promouvoir l’héritage des femmes et leurs droits à la terre.. Les récipiendaires ont aidé des femmes sourdes en  ...   council of chiefs of the need for a community resource centre in the village.. This ensured that the entire community would be willing to take part in the project, and benefit from it thereafter.. The cooperation of the Baale also means that our presence in the community is not a threat to anyone.. In respect to strong gender based structures, which do not favour women in the community, the acceptance of our project means that we have sort of broken what could be considered a significant gender rubicund.. Five female teachers, five community women and five male teachers have successfully completed the.. training and have acquired sufficient efficacy to intermediate between the rural women farmers and the city buyers.. Gender issues and challenges.. We also largely successfully mobilised the community women, but implementing a project for women in Arulogun without involving their men is totally unthinkable.. The five consultations with the Baale and his chiefs in council excluded women, despite clear indication in our presentations that the project was focused on women.. The community leaders made it very clear to us that deciding the nature and extent of involvement of the women in the project, and in fact in any project in the community, was in the best interest of the women.. They also decided that more men than women would be required to take part both in the training and implementation of the projects, all in the interest of the women.. This very strong glass ceiling inhibited our interaction with the women at the early stage of the project, and limited the involvement of women and their opinions in the project.. Pregnant women and nursing mothers were also automatically excluded, due to the high infant mortality rate in the community.. But women themselves were also unwilling to participate, except with the full consent and permission of the elders.. Women who eventually indicated interest to participate in the project also requested that issues about women’s empowerment be downplayed, in order to ensure the smooth flow of the project.. Other than three of the six female teachers in the Saint James primary school who had handsets, none of the women farmers owned or had access to mobile phones.. We were even initially advised not to give mobile phones to women or teach them how to use them as this could be misinterpreted by their husbands as a ploy to lure them out of their marital homes, or make them wild.. One of the major explanations for this practice is that the men needed the women as hands in the farms, both to cultivate, care for the farms, process the products and carry them to the markets and sell them for their husbands.. ‘Opening’ the eyes of these women could make them run to the cities in search of more improved livelihood, or run to other men who are economically better off.. An observation that translates to.. and gender issue is that while some of the men had some education, all the women we encountered did not have any form of modern education.. This limitation not only inhibited the women from using.. , the women were just incapable of doing so.. Community mobilisation and sustainability.. Given these obstacles, we needed to be strategic in order to gain the support form the community.. While the training is aimed for selected persons, we considered how to mobilise the women without infringing on the culture of the community which we had known had the capability of stopping our project implementation.. Our first mobilization was the consultation with the Baale and his Chiefs in Council on our need to mobilize the women.. This we did to ensure that our project had legitimacy in the community, forestalling any hindrances from any of the villages and their leaders as well as securing the support of the other leaders of the land, and make our mission clear to the people in the community.. We have already entered into a discussion with the community Anglican church, St James, on how to use the instrument of the organization to continue the project after the project life has expired.. To make this possible, two of the community women involved in the training activities were members of the church.. We have also initiated contacts with prominent members of the community who live in the cities for further assistance.. Although not much has been achieved in this regard, we will pay some great attention on this component in second tranche of the project.. Radio improves the livelihoods of rural women in Ghana.. Women in rural Ghana using radio.. In Ghana, the livelihood of rural women is being improved through radio and other ICTs.. At the time of writing the proposal, the initial was to train some women to act as radio hosts.. However, further discussions revealed that this might not be sustainable after the project funding is over.. Therefore, we liaised with Nabiina FM to partner and introduce the programme with funding from the.. CIC.. for the first 30 shows.. A female professional DJ, Ms Philomena Aboko, would be the host of the programme.. During the second meeting, Ms Philomena was present.. She took time to train the women leaders on how to serve as panellists in a radio discussion.. The weekly show comes on every Thursday, from 7 to 8pm and is dubbed “Gender Focus”.. The show covers a variety of themes affecting women – topics such as women in politics, marriage and its challenges, the indecent dress of young girls, stray animals and their effects on the farm, girl child education and discipline, negative traditional practices, female genital mutilation, women’s rights, sexually transmitted infections, women’s health and family planning, etc.. The radio has helped significantly in sharing knowledge.. Meetings were held between the women leaders and the staff of the radio centre.. During these meetings, the issue of knowledge sharing, especially using the medium of radio has been key.. This has resulted in the successful holding of weekly discussions on Nabiina FM, the local community radio station.. It became clear that the women were, indeed listening to the programme because of the comments they would make regarding the programme – things like it was not long enough to cover the subject in depth, they would invite other friends over to listen to it, they could not always call in to the programme because they did not have credits on their phones, and even the impact the programme had on their husbands and sons, and the desire to sustain the programme after the funding and project are over.. Female teachers are learning the relevant.. skills for their work.. Because the literacy rates were quite low for most (women) beneficiaries, we realized that the use of computers would not be very significant to many of them.. For this reason, we decided to turn to schools, where the impact of the project would be felt much more widely.. The training was tailored to include a lot of hands-on exercises and a focus on the tools teachers would need to get their work done more efficiently.. Second cycle schools in the catchment area of the.. were asked to nominate two female teachers each, for free training at the.. as a part of the programme.. Training started in earnest and the teachers are wiling to make huge sacrifices, especially with their time to learn these relevant skills.. Taught areas of Open Office have and will continue to focus on skills relevant to the school and classroom environment.. We noticed that attendance to training sessions was consistently high, and that the trainees would come to class with questions based on their own attempts to achieve a task outside of the training.. They were also able to complete gradually more complicated hands-on tasks and act more independently.. However, despite the success of the project so far, we have also encountered some challenges: time, distance and communication and costs.. The time for the radio show is quite short – many women have expressed their desire for a longer show, but we cannot extend it because of the other scheduled programmes on the station and this would require additional funds.. Some women also live quite far, making it difficult for them to attend panel discussions.. Some of the women panellists also do not have radio or telephones, which also makes it difficult for them to follow the show on a regular basis.. Many women are not literate, making it difficult for them to make good used of certain.. devises like mobile phones for.. Also, due to the role of women in many communities, they must attend the markets in the early hours in order to do the trading for their homes.. Clearly, the cost of landlines, mobile phones and phone credit were also a barrier to our achieving 100% results.. The cost of these was a prohibiting factor to the participation of many women.. We have recently started to meet with staff of the two Vocational schools in the district to liaise with them and organise workshops on entrepreneurial skills capacity building for students of these schools.. Incidentally both schools are single sex schools for females.. Market information through SMS is making a difference in rural Cameroon.. Market information is an important tool that will help Ms.. FONKA.. to sell her potato better and improve her revenues.. During the first six months of the project target groups were identified.. They were five maize and potato women farmers group in four localities, Kamna, Ndiengso, Ndiandam, Santa and Bangang.. The aim was to train them in the use of cell phones in order to obtain market information.. One of the challenges identified during this first phase was lack of electricity in some areas, which limited farmers in their use of ICTs.. Those who owned phones had them operational only at certain times because they had to travel a long distance before they could access electricity to charge their battery.. A survey was carried out.. The analysis of the data indicated that 87% of the decisions on farm activities are made by women.. For purchasing of ICTs (TV sets, mobile phones, computers, internet assets), data indicated that 80% of the decisions are taken by men.. This can be attributed to their poor financial contribution, when compared to men.. Surprisingly however, 70% of the use of the items is made by women.. All those who were interviewed responded that they had never used any form of.. to facilitate the acquisition of seeds, fertiliser and pesticides.. A similar response was also obtained for market information including also agro-pastoral advice from extension service.. It was found that 5% of men and no women had used the telephone to obtain market information.. In addition to the sensitization and education of women, attention was given to a number of men who showed an interest thanks to the use of ICTs involved.. One of the examples was Tamessa, who started to plant maize and beans in his farm, while Mr.. NEKUE.. , a retired secondary school teacher planted maize and groundnuts.. Traditionally, farming is seen as an activity carried out by women and after the sensitisation activities, other men decided to join their wives in the farm.. The use of cell phone for market information demonstrated a significant economic impact given that maize farmers found he subsidised seeds at 300.. CFA.. compared to the 600.. they were getting at the open market.. Other maize farmers were able to get the very scarce improved variety “kassai”.. The Gyendu potato farmer groups made a better harmonisation of the collection of their seeds from the main extension store, thereby saving on expenses that they would have spent on numerous unsuccessful trips to the store.. Other achievements have been made with fertilizer and pesticides.. Farmers also learnt to collect market information o insecticides and fungicides to control maize stem borer and potato blight, the pest and diseases that most affect their crops.. “This is cheap and easy,” Ma Theresa of the Gyendu group stated.. With cell phones they can also buy from the neighbouring cities, where they can find better prices.. An analysis of the reason why men did not like to do planting also had to do with the equipment used.. A new tool for planting was suggested, since the old planter is known in all the community as the women’s planter, so no man will use it.. The new planter is manufactured and traded far in Yaounde, but since farmers could use cell phones to get market information and buy remotely the adoption was easy.. The project team concluded that computers should be brought in as an additional.. tool for the project.. Consequently the market information obtained by the group facilitator and shared among the group verbally and also through.. will be filed electronically.. Additionally, this information will be organized, edited and printed in the form of a technical bulletin and distributed to farmers with a special focus on those having limited access to cell phones.. Attachment.. Size.. Read the full mid-term report.. 9 MB.. GenARDIS grantee receives award in Rome.. Johnstone Baguma, from GenARDIS grantee ToroDev based in Uganda, attended the International Conference on Social innovations for a Better World in Our Time held, in Rome Italy, in early October 2009.. There, he presented a paper on the role of ICTs in improving the economic standard of the rural poor, especially women and young people in Uganda and Africa at large.. His presentation highlighted the experiences of the.. Research Resource Centre (Kabarole Information Centre) co-run by ToroDev and the GenARDIS project.. ToroDev was also announced winner of the Global Junior Challenge on Social Innovations 2009, for its exemplary use of.. in rural development of the poor in the Rwenzori region of western Uganda.. More information:.. http://www.. socialinnovationconference.. org/ITA/index.. html.. mondodigitale..

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  • Title: Knowledge Sharing Space | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Stories.. Blogs.. Photo gallery.. Random image.. Knowledge Sharing Space.. Submitted by LisaC on Mon, 03/29/2010 - 08:37.. GenARDIS is for rural mothers across rural Africa, who can now provide additional income for their families because they can now market to buyers from outside their community.. GenARDIS is for small women farmers who are no longer being taken advantage of by the middle man, that can now get a fair price for their crop by sending a simple.. It is for Cameroon farming women who were able to purchase new and more appropriate farming tools thanks to increased revenues and the ability to call into town to order the product.. LisaC s blog.. Day one of genARDIS workshop off with a bang.. Submitted by LisaC on Wed, 03/24/2010 - 19:16.. Now in our third round of GenARDIS, this morning s workshop session was opened as the group was welcomed by exploring the question why – Why GenARDIS? Oumy Ndiaye of the.. began the discussion by sharing her personal interest in the small grants fun, but also elaborated on its importance on a greater scale.. “GenARDIS,” she explained, “is an opportunity to see things move, and seeing the good ideas being implemented on the ground.. ”.. Executive Director Anriette Esterhuisen  ...   Par la maîtrise de l informatique, elle représente aujourd hui pour son groupement une icone indispensable au développement et à la vulgarisation de leurs activités; elle bénéficie de ce statuts grâce à son niveau plus élevé de scolarisation.. Bien qu étant toujours pauvre comme les autres membres de son groupement, elle se sent néanmoins fier de faire valoir sa scolarisation et d avoir eu un plus sur elle.. ibrahim s blog.. The Gender Digital Divide in Francophone Africa: A Harsh Reality.. Women have one chance in three less than men to benefit in the African Information Society.. In the “Gender Digital Divide in Francophone Africa” research on six countries (Benin, Burkina FasoBurkina Faso, Cameroon, Mali, Mauritania and Senegal) conducted by the Gender and ICT Network, connections between gender and ICTs were found to be widely unrecognised.. Looking at control, content, capacities and connectivity, the research measured gender disparities that are present with regard to access, use and mastery of ICTs.. The reality surfaced from the results is as the title suggests, harsh.. However, more positively, this collaborative research has developed critical statistical tools to enable concrete measurement of the gender digital divide.. In turn, the data and knowledge base established renders the gender dimension in this field significantly visible..

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  • Title: GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Accueil.. A propos de GenARDIS.. Gagnants de 2005.. Actualités et Interviews.. Administrateur de GenARDIS.. Programme d'appui aux réseaux de femmes.. Association pour le progrès des communications.. Partenaires de GenARDIS.. et Rurale ACP-UE.. Centre.. Institut humaniste de coopération avec les pays en développement.. Institut international pour la communication et le développement.. Nous  ...   :.. Nom d'utilisateur :.. Mot de passe :.. Demander un nouveau mot de passe.. Utilisateurs en ligne.. Il y a actuellement.. 1 utilisateur.. et.. 6 invités.. en ligne.. Vous devez.. vous connecter.. pour poster des commentaires.. 1 fichier attaché.. En savoir plus.. janvier 18, 2011.. septembre 20, 2010.. suivant ›.. dernier »..

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  • Title: User account | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: User account.. Log in.. Username or e-mail address:..

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  • Title: GenARDIS 2002 - 2010 Des petites subventions qui ont transformé la vie des femmes en agriculture | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Genardis_FR_web.. pdf.. 1007.. 9 KB..

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  • Title: User account | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Enter your GenARDIS Website username.. Enter the password that accompanies your username.. CAPTCHA.. This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.. What code is in the image?:.. Copy the characters (respecting upper/lower case) from the image..

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  • Title: GenARDIS 2002 - 2010 Small grants that made big changes for women in agriculture. | GenARDIS Website
    Descriptive info: Radio drama, mobile phone and open software applications were some of the original approaches that I’ve found particularly inspiring.. The book is available in both English and French and is 48 pages long.. It has been produced by the Association for Progressive Communications (.. ) with the generous support of the International Development Research Centre (.. IDRC.. ), Canada, one of the GenARDIS partners.. Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.. 0.. http://creativecommons.. org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.. 0/.. Genardis_EN_web.. pdf-1.. 918.. 92 KB..

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