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    Archived pages: 423 . Archive date: 2014-01.

  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers Civil War Information
    Descriptive info: Just for Kids Teachers - Civil War Information.. Antietam Sharpsburg Maryland.. American Civil War - September 16-18, 1862.. Anteitam battle field on the day of the battle September 16,1862.. On September 16, Maj.. Gen.. George B.. McClellan confronted Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Sharpsburg, Maryland.. At dawn September 17, Hooker's corps mounted a powerful assault on Lee's left flank that began the single bloodiest day in American military history.. Attacks and counterattacks swept across Miller's cornfield and fighting swirled around the Dunker Church.. Union assaults against the Sunken Road eventually pierced the Confederate center, but the Federal advantage was not followed up.. Late in the day, Burnside's corps finally got into action, crossing the stone bridge over Antietam Creek and rolling up the Confederate right.. At a crucial moment, A.. P.. Hill's division  ...   their lines.. In spite of crippling casualties, Lee continued to skirmish with McClellan throughout the 18th, while removing his wounded south of the river.. McClellan did not renew the assaults.. After dark, Lee ordered the battered Army of Northern Virginia to withdraw across the Potomac into the Shenandoah Valley.. Result(s): Inconclusive (Union strategic victory.. ).. Location: Washington County.. Campaign: Maryland Campaign (September 1862).. Date(s): September 16-18, 1862.. Principal Commanders: Maj.. McClellan [US]; Gen.. Robert E.. Lee [CS].. Forces Engaged: Armies.. Estimated Casualties: 23,100 total.. January 5-6, 1862 Hancock / Romney Campaign.. Sept 14, 1862 South Mountain / Crampton Gap / Turner Gap / Fox Gap.. September 16-18, 1862 Antietam / Sharpsburg.. July 6-16, 1863 Williamsport / Hagerstown / Falling Waters.. July 8, 1863 Boonsboro.. July 9, 1864 Monocacy.. August 1, 1864 Folck's Mill / Cumberland..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers Civil War Information
    Descriptive info: Williamsport, Hagerstown, Maryland Falling Waters, West Virginia.. American Civil War - July 6-16, 1863.. During the night of July 4-5, Lee's battered army began its retreat from Gettysburg, moving southwest on the Fairfield Road toward Hagerstown and Williamsport, screened by Stuart's cavalry.. The Union infantry followed cautiously the next day, converging on Middletown, Maryland.. On July 7, Imboden (CS) stopped Buford's Union cavalry from occupying Williamsport and destroying Confederate trains.. Kilpatrick's cavalry division drove two Confederate cavalry brigades through Hagerstown before being forced to retire by the arrival of the rest of Stuart's command.. Lee's infantry reached the rain-swollen Potomac River but could not cross, the pontoon bridge having been destroyed by a cavalry raid.. On July 11, Lee entrenched a line, protecting the river crossings at Williamsport and  ...   of a new bridge, and Lee's army began crossing the river after dark on the 13th.. On the morning of the 14th, Kilpatrick's and Buford's cavalry divisions attacked the rearguard division of Henry Heth still on the north bank, taking more than 500 prisoners.. Confederate Brig.. James Pettigrew was mortally wounded in the fight.. On July 16, David McM.. Gregg's cavalry approached Shepherdstown where Fitzhugh Lee's and J.. R.. Chambliss's brigades, supported by M.. J.. Ferguson's, held the Potomac River fords against the Union infantry.. Fitzhugh Lee and Chambliss attacked Gregg, who held out against several attacks and sorties, fighting sporadically until nightfall when he withdrew.. Result(s): Inconclusive.. Campaign: Gettysburg Campaign (June-August 1863).. Date(s): July 6-16, 1863.. George G.. Meade [US]; Gen.. Forces Engaged: Divisions.. Estimated Casualties: 1,730 total..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers Civil War Information
    Descriptive info: Boonsboro Maryland.. American Civil War - July 8, 1863.. On July 8, the Confederate cavalry, holding the South Mountain passes, fought a rearguard action against elements of the Union 1st and 3rd Cavalry Divisions and infantry.. This action was one of a series of cavalry combats fought around Boonsboro, Hagerstown, and Williamsport.. Date(s): July 8, 1863.. Alfred Pleasonton [US]; Maj.. J.. E.. B.. Stuart [CS].. Estimated Casualties: 100 total..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers Civil War Information
    Descriptive info: Monocacy Maryland.. American Civil War - July 9, 1864.. After marching north through the Shenandoah Valley from Lynchburg, the Confederate army of Lt.. Jubal A.. Early side-stepped the Federal garrison at Harpers Ferry and crossed the Potomac River at Shepherdstown into Maryland on July 5-6.. On July 9, 1864, a makeshift Union force under Maj.. Lew Wallace attempted to arrest Early's invading Confederate divisions along the Monocacy River, just east of Frederick.. Wallace, joined by Ricketts's Division of the VI Corps that had been rushed from the Petersburg lines, was outflanked by Gordon's Division and defeated after  ...   transports at City Point, sending it with all dispatch to Washington.. Wallace's defeat at Monocacy bought time for these veteran troops to arrive to bolster the defenses of Washington.. Early's advance reached the outskirts of Washington on the afternoon of July 11, and the remaining divisions of the VI Corps began disembarking that evening.. Monocacy was called the Battle that Saved Washington.. Result(s): Confederate victory.. Location: Frederick County.. Campaign: Early's Raid and Operations against the B O Railroad (June-August 1864).. Date(s): July 9, 1864.. Lew Wallace [US]; Lt.. Early [CS].. Forces Engaged: Corps.. Estimated Casualties: 2,359 total..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers Civil War Information
    Descriptive info: Cumberland Maryland.. American Civil War - August 1, 1864.. After burning Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, on July 30, Johnson's and McCausland's cavalry brigades rode towards Cumberland, Maryland, to disrupt the B O Railroad.. Brig.. Benjamin Kelly organized a small force of soldiers and citizens to meet the Confederate advance.. On August 1, Kelly ambushed Rebel cavalrymen near Cumberland at Folck's Mill, and skirmishing continued for several hours.. Eventually the Confederates withdrew.. Location: Allegany County.. Date(s): August 1, 1864.. Principal Commanders: Brig.. Benjamin F.. Kelly [US]; Brig.. John McCausland [CS].. Estimated Casualties: 38 total..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers: Research
    Descriptive info: Just for Kids Teachers - Research.. by Timothy Crumrin.. The first cries for a "national road" were heard before there was even a.. nation.. These calls for a road to the west came as early as the 1740s and say much about the time and place.. For instance, the "west" was viewed roughly as those lands which lay between the Alleghenies and Ohio River.. And to many, the road was not an end unto itself.. Due to the perceived superiority of water travel, the proposed road was seen primarily as a portage between waterways.. Several groups lobbied for a road or roads to facilitate settlement and the transfer of goods.. The few western settlers themselves wished for an avenue to make it easier to market their goods and buy essential supplies in return.. Land speculators realized the importance of an infrastructure in the west.. Members of the first Ohio Company, a group that included a young George Washington, clamored for a road, knowing it would greatly enhance their western land's value.. The company went so far as to hire Christopher Gist and Thomas Cresap to explore their lands and seek the best route for a road.. In 1752 Cresap employed a Delaware Chief named Nemacolin to mark a path for a roadway-- which eventually followed an old Indian trail.. The military, too, saw the advantages of a western road.. British General Edward Braddock, accompanied by George Washington, constructed a military road from Cumberland, Maryland to Ft.. Duquesne which paralleled Nemacolin's.. However, these were "roads" in name only.. In actuality they were little more than crude trails carved out of the wilderness, filled with stumps, sinkholes, and deep entrapping ruts.. Despite the perceived need for a sturdy road to the west, little was done.. Surveying the Path.. With the troubled birth of the United States came renewed calls for a road to the west.. The cited reasons were much the same as before.. Such a road would facilitate settlement and that seemed particularly important now that Revolutionary War veterans had been given tracts in the west.. Also growing was the idea that the nation had to expand in order to survive and flourish.. Economic considerations weighed heavily in favor of a national road, which would be a two-way street allowing farmers and traders in the west to send their production east in exchange for manufactures goods and other essential of life.. Government officials feared that if such a trade network was not established westerners would turn increasingly to the Spanish and their great "national road," the Mississippi River, or to the British in Canada as trading partners.. George Washington continued his support for a road.. His extensive western travels, experiences as a military commander, and land speculating convinced him that a "smooth way" was needed to "open a wide door" to the west.. In 1784 Washington traveled to the west, in part to contemplate the best routes for portages and roads.. Along the way he invariably asked settlers their views of the optimal routes.. While staying at a land agent's cabin near present-day Morgantown, West Virginia he met a young surveyor who was later to play a vital role in making the national road a reality, Albert Gallatin.. Gallatin advised Washington on possible routes.. Eighteen years later, while Jefferson's Treasury Secretary, he would help formulate the plan to fund the project.. So, by the end of the eighteenth century there was a growing consensus that a national road was needed.. The two biggest obstacles were how it was to be funded and where it should be constructed.. Paving the Way.. As always the most vexing problem was funding.. The debate about paying for a national road came hot upon the heels of other money arguments and in the middle of the controversies surrounding the proper role of the federal government.. Who should pay? Some thought costs should be borne by the states or territories it would help most.. The federal government, they said, should have no role in internal improvements.. It was unconstitutional to do so.. Working behind the scenes Gallatin and others came up with a workable solution.. In a February 2, 1802 letter, known as the "Origin of the National Road," Gallatin proposed that states exempt federal land sales from taxation and earmark a percentage of the proceeds for roadbuilding "first from the navigable waters emptying into the Atlantic to the Ohio, and afterwards continued through the new states".. Gallatin's idea caught fire and the enabling act making Ohio a state contained.. provisions allotting federal land sale proceeds to finance the road.. Such provisions later made their way into the laws of Indiana and Illinois to finance their part of the road.. Like the Ohio law they stipulated 3/5 of the funds for construction within the state and 2/5 for the road to and from its borders.. The usual committee was formed.. It reported to the senate that a road was feasible and would ".. make the crooked ways straight, and the rough ways smooth,.. will, in effect, remove the intervening mountains; and, by facilitating the intercourse of our western brethren with those on the Atlantic, substantially unite them in interest.. " The road, they said, would be the "cement of the union.. ".. With proceeds from land sales mounting, it was obvious that the new nation had found a will to do the job and now it had the means.. What was missing was the way.. Pointing the Way.. Still to be decided was the actual route.. Needless to say politicians and merchants in cities from Richmond to Philadelphia held out hope that their city would be a terminus.. The senate committee had other ideas.. On December 19, 1805 it reported on several possible routes, but recommended one from Cumberland Maryland to the Ohio River.. Whatever route was ultimately chosen, committee members hoped the road would be built in as straight a line as possible and with as little deviation as necessary.. Congress passed a bill to that effect eight days later.. The choice of Cumberland as the starting point was a logical one.. It was connected to Baltimore by an existing road and a proposal to make the Potomac navigable to Cumberland was under study (Gallatin had landholdings in the Potomac area).. The city had also been the jumping off point for the Nemacolin, Braddock, and Ohio Company efforts.. The ensuing years saw the passage of various laws that set the great project in motion.. In 1806 Jefferson signed legislation officially establishing a national highway to run from Cumberland to the Mississippi, with the stipulation that it run through the capitals of each state along the route.. Commissioners were appointed, surveyors contracted, bids let but it was not until 1811 that the real work actually began.. Building the Road.. There were sound principles underlaying the building of the National Road.. The guiding tenets were the shortest distance between two points and water crossings made where the waterway was most navigable, not where most convenient.. Later there were deviations from the avowed course due to political considerations, but they were slight.. Specification for the road were also well-conceived.. They called for slopes no steeper than 5% of the horizon, a 66 foot, cleared right of way, and a roadway twenty feet wide and covered with "stone, earth, or gravel, or a combination of some or all of them.. " How closely these specifications were met depended upon the locality and officials involved.. Technically, the commissioners had to obtain permission to place the road across occupied land, though they were to make no use of the right of eminent domain.. Additionally, no compensation was offered to landowners, because, it was felt, the road brought "nothing but benefits and blessings" in its wake.. Few property owners balked; most were farmers who happily donated their 66 foot strip of land knowing it would benefit them in the long run.. Once the legalities were out of the way, the very hard work began.. First in were the laborers with mattocks, axes, hoes, rakes, and shovels who set out clearing  ...   of the road, of course, was that it considerably shortened travel times.. In 1832, even before the road was completed, it advertised its trips from Dayton to Indianapolis as taking only two and a half, with nightly stops at inns or taverns.. Later, "express" stage services claimed the ability to cross 150 miles of the road in a day.. Another heavy presence on the road were the ubiquitous teamsters who, like modern-day truckers, hauled their freight day and night.. They often drove conestoga wagons, perhaps the vehicles most associated with the National Road.. The six-horse team so closely identified with these haulers was actually a National Road innovation that allowed the teamsters to more efficiently exploit the highly profitable business of transporting goods.. The wagons often competed for space with herds of cattle and pigs being driven to market.. Perhaps the group most associated with the road were the settlers using it as an avenue to a new life.. Families, often complete with household good, numerous children, and a few farm animals clogged the road.. The highway became the yellow brick road to a new eden.. The above description of the road as clogged is an apt one.. Observers marveled at the traffic.. One Hoosier took note of the phenomena as it appeared in the 1840s: "From morning til night, there was a constant rumble of wheels.. when the rush was greatest,there was never a minute that wagons were not in site [sic], and as a rule, one company of wagons was closely followed by another.. " During many periods traffic was so constant a traveler noted that the wagons were so closely strung together they resembled a train upon its tracks.. It was a sight which inspired wanderlust.. The same Hoosier wrote that "with the tinkling of the bells, the rumbling of the wheels, the noise of the animals and the chatter of the people.. the little boy who had gone to the road from his lonesome home in the woods was captivated and carried away into the great active world.. A wondrous assortment of vehicles passed along the road.. Stage coaches, small farm wagons, and buggy-like wagons for personal use jostled for their share of roadway.. But the kings of the road were the conestogas.. From the larger ones used for freight hauling to the smaller models that carried a nation westward, they were everywhere.. Many myths have grown tall around the conestoga.. One of the biggest is that they were built in their now-familiar shape so they might float across rivers and streams.. They certainly resembled a boat, but float they could not.. The design actually allowed for easier front and back loading, while maintaining a short wheel base allowing for a smaller turning radius.. It also afforded greater protection from the ever present elements.. Seldom were their riders on a conestoga.. The driver normally walked alongside or rode the lead horse-- although some featured a "lazy board" for those unwilling to walk.. Another feature often noted were the conestoga bells.. A great variety of styles adorned the horses and it was said you could differentiate the drivers by the tinkling of their bells.. Small debts of gratitude--or thirst-quenching-- were often settled by the teamster by the bestowing of a bell or set of bells.. It was said that the married teamster who returned home without his full complement of bells would face rough treatment from his wife.. The residents of Indianapolis were accustomed to the wide variety of vehicles passing by, but in 1854 a rare sight supposedly caught them by surprise.. A "take-your-own-house-and-walk immigrant" rolled along the highway in a cabin fitted with wagon wheels.. This strange contraption was drawn by four horses and came complete with a fireplace at one end.. A local wit commented that he "saw no barns and outhouses, but they might well be along soon.. Many business sprang up to serve all of this traffic.. Blacksmith shops to make repairs, stores to victual them, and livery stables to provide for horses, lined the road.. But perhaps the most numerous and renowned of theses service industries were the inns and hotels.. They were the oases, truckstops, and travel plazas of the period, offering a myriad of services.. The weary traveler could get a room, food, drink, a place for his animals, and any number of other blandishments to make life a little easier.. In some, it was said, those of a baser sort could entertain themselves with too much liquor, a few hands of cards, and perhaps some fleeting companionship for an evening.. Inns were everywhere.. One estimate says they averaged one each mile in Pennsylvania and parts of Ohio.. There was perhaps one every five miles in Indiana.. Not all of the establishments could be described as elegant.. Some were fly-by-night operations that were little more than farmhouses near the road which took in guests.. Still more would have been more than willing to sell a bit of the ardent spirits without having to deal with providing food and shelter.. To prevent such activities Indiana passed a law in 1832 which stipulated taverns and inns must have at least one spare room with two beds and stabling for four horses to acquire a liquor license.. End of the Road.. The National Road stopped at Vandalia, Illinois in 1852.. The dream of many to extend it to the Mississippi River and beyond was never fulfilled.. Among other factors, the road fell victim to the squabbling over internal improvements, sectionalism, and constitutional interpretation.. The last regular federal appropriation for the road was in 1838.. States provided funding through tolls and appropriations in order to press on.. The federal government began to cede control of varying aspects of the road to the states through which it passed as early as 1831.. Despite this turning away there is no doubt about the significance of the road.. It fulfilled many of the promises of its advocates.. It stimulated settlement in the west.. Indiana's population, for example, more than quadrupled between 1820 and 1840 and many came to the state upon the National Road-- especially during the swelling days of the Jacksonian migration.. Similar figures may be noted for other states in the "west.. " Associated with this phenomena was townbuilding stimulated by the road.. Again, Indiana may serve as an example.. When the survey began in Indiana in 1827, Indianapolis was virtually the only town between Centerville and Terre Haute, a distance of nearly 125 miles.. Within eight years more at least nine new towns and villages sprang up which still exist.. The sword was double-edged though.. The little Hoosier hamlet of Vandalia died because it was too far removed from the route.. Some of its buildings were moved to form the nucleus of one of the towns which grew along the road, Cambridge City.. Brazil, Indiana, grew from a stage line relay station to become the seat of Clay County because the previous county seat, Bowling Green, was situated far south of the road.. The National Road was indeed a two-way street that aided the economy by facilitating the transfer of goods and was to play a role in "nationalizing" trade.. Manufactures from the east more readily made their way west, often passing the product of the west heading in the other direction.. The road helped the nation expand while drawing it closer together.. The National Road (it was also called the Cumberland Road, National Pike and other names, but National Road was most popular by 1825) also contributed to the national consciousness.. It was celebrated in song, story, painting, and poetry; political tickets adopted the name for themselves.. Many towns along the route today call their main street National Avenue, Street, or Road.. The federal government drew farther away from the road as time passed.. In 1879 it ceded the last of its control when it granted Ohio and Maryland the right to make the road free; in return the United States was absolved in any further responsibility or liability for the road.. The National Road was national no more..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers: Educator and Teacher Resources
    Descriptive info: Just for Kids Teachers - Educator & Teacher Resources.. Washington County Maryland Public Schools.. 1895 Rand McNally Map of Maryland.. 1.. 7 MB Image File.. Maryland Topographic Map.. Satellite Image of Maryland.. Social Studies in Maryland.. Congress Link.. Presented by The Dirksen Congressional Center, a non-profit, nonpartisan research and educational organization, as a service for teachers.. Excellent source of innovative lesson plans.. Dear Mrs.. Roosevelt.. Outstanding lesson plan that deals with childrens' lives during the Great Depression.. Documents in the Classroom.. A great collection of programs available, on-line, for use in the classroom and by students.. Immigration Lesson Plans.. Complete list of free lesson plans provided by the American Immigration Law Foundation.. Lessons for K-12 help students undertand the importance of citizenship and laws and rights associated with immigration to the U.. S.. Inaugural Classroom.. Students learn how the president is selected and what happens and why on Inauguration day.. Kid's White House.. Kids will enjoy their own  ...   the Shadows.. US Civil War Information.. Teacher Resources:.. Computer Learning Foundation.. Edsitement.. Education World.. National Archives Digital Classroom.. National History Day.. National Park Service's The Learning Place.. Tech Corps.. Here are a few phone numbers, if your mouse gives out and you have to turn to more traditional methods of communication:.. Arkansas Educational Telecommunications Network 501-450-1727.. The Center for the Study of Southern Culture 601-232-5993.. The Civil War Education Association 703-678-8598.. Cobblestone Publishing, Inc.. 603-924-7209.. Educational Technology 1-800-952-2665.. The History Channel 212-210-9780.. Library of Congress 202-707-5000.. National Archives 202-501-5400.. National Council for History Education 216-835-1776.. National Council for the Social Studies 202-966-7840.. National Foundation for the Improvement of Education 202-822-7840.. National Genealogical Society 703-525-0050.. National Park Service Resources:.. American Battlefield Protection Program 202-343-3941.. National Register of Historic Places 202-343-9536.. Parks as Classrooms 202-785-4500.. PARTNERS Project 304-535-6767.. Teaching With Historic Places 202-343-9536.. Smithsonian Institution 202-357-1300.. United States Army Center of Military History 202-761-5373.. United States Civil War Center 504-522-3328..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Just for Kids and Teachers: Nothing to Do?
    Descriptive info: Just for Kids Teachers - Nothing to Do?.. N.. othing to do?.. Make a civil war drum.. During the Civil War, boys under the age of 16 served in both the Union and Confederate (southern) armies.. Most of them played the drum, fife or bugle.. Their music woke soldiers in the morning, called them to breakfast and summoned them to other activities.. These boys did other chores such as cutting hair, carrying water and helping the wounded.. See It /Hear It - Drum Cadence.. Civil War Reenactor drummers beat out a cadence.. (Audio and video file, 147k).. To play these, you will need RealPlayer.. Get RealPlayer here.. John Lincoln Clem was the youngest soldier ever to serve.. When he was nine, he tried to join a regiment in his home state of Ohio.. They turned him down.. However, he ran away from home and attached himself to the 22nd Michigan Infantry.. The soldiers gave him a drum and chipped in to pay him a soldier's wages.. In April 1862 a shell smashed his drum at the Battle of Shiloh, and he became known as "Johnny Shiloh.. Without a drum, he was given a musket cut down to his size.. During the battle, he was separated from his regiment.. While caught on the Confederate side, he wounded a Confederate colonel.. Later, the Confederates captured him and held him prisoner for two months.. Eventually,  ...   by striking the head, which is stretched over a shell or frame.. The head vibrates and pushes air through the shell which resonates and amplifies (makes louder) the sound.. Drums are struck with sticks, mallets, or hands.. Each creates a different quality of sound.. Here are the directions for making your own drum.. Find a Container.. You can use any one of a number of different kinds of containers at home such as an oatmeal box, coffee can, salt box or small nut can.. Remove the top and bottom of the can or box.. Draw a Design for the Outside of Your Drum.. Take a piece of paper and cut it.. so you can wrap it around the container.. Make your own design on the paper with crayons, paints, chalk or colored pencils.. Then tape or glue your picture.. around the container.. Make the Top and Bottom.. Use material such as canvas, heavy paper, rubber inner tube or leather.. Cut two pieces of the material that are a little larger.. than the top and bottom of the container.. Tie the two pieces of material around the top and bottom of the container with two shoestrings, pieces.. of string, yarn or rubber band.. Drumsticks.. To beat the drum, use your hands or such items as dowel rods or pencils.. Drums.. When you finish making your drum, it could look like one of these:..

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  • Title: Hagerstown – Condado de Washington CVB - Cosas gratis y de bajo costo para hacer
    Descriptive info: Cosas gratis y de bajo costo para hacer en el condado de Washington.. English.. *.. Denota gratis.. **.. Denota donación sugerida.. ***.. Denota estacionamiento por tarifa.. LUGARES.. Parques y Atractivos Naturales :.. Appalachian Trail.. *.. Catoctin Mountain Park.. C O Canal.. Hagerstown City Park.. Pen Mar Park.. Western Maryland Rail Trail.. Museos y atracciones históricas :.. Fort Frederick State Park.. Greenbrier State Park.. Hagerstown Railroad Museum.. Hagerstown Roundhouse Museum.. Harpers  ...   Exhibit Cente.. r.. South Mountain State Park and Battlefield.. Walking Tours of Downtown Hagerstown.. Washington County Museum of Fine Arts.. Washington County Rural Heritage Museum.. Washington Monument State Park.. EVENTOS.. Western Maryland Blues Fest.. (conciertos los jueves y domingos son gratis).. Bridge of Life Church Movie Night in Downtown Hagerstown.. (cada sábado).. Hagerstown Suns.. juegos de béisbol.. Salute to Independence.. Washington County Free Library Lecture Series.. William M.. Brish Planetarium..

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  • Title: Hagerstown – Condado de Washington CVB - Servicios de área local
    Descriptive info: Buscar en la base de datos de área local de Servicio.. El Condado de Washington tiene una larga lista de actividades educativas y recreativas.. El Condado de Washington es el lugar para buen golf, compras en tiendas de lujo y de oportunidades, restaurantes, museos, teatro, magníficos hotel es y salas de reuniones.. ¡Nos gusta mucho ser la sede de convenciones y grupos!.. Busque categoría de  ...   Computer Integrators.. Convenience Stores.. Development Construction.. Emergency Care/Hospital.. Family Care Services.. Financial Services.. Government Agencies.. Graphics/Printing/Signs.. Health Wellness.. House of Worship.. Insurance.. Internet Provider.. Media.. Misc.. Services.. Office Supplies.. Orthodontist.. Photography/Video.. Publications.. Realtors.. RV Service Sales.. Schools/Training.. Spa.. Taxi.. Tour/Travel Agencies.. Transportation.. Utilities.. Veterinarian.. Web Design.. O Seleccione Categoría.. Atracciones.. Hoteles.. Camping.. Hostales.. Casas de Huéspedes.. Recreación.. Museos and Lugares Históricos.. Servicios.. Restaurantes.. Servicios Religiosos..

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  • Title: Hagerstown Washington County CVB - Contact Us
    Descriptive info: 150th Maryland Campaign.. Video Dining Guide.. Itineraries & Packages.. Staycations.. Local Receptive Agents.. Banquet Facilities.. Search Again.. Bed and Breakfasts.. 1828 Trail Inn B&B.. Hancock.. MD.. Antietam's Jacob Rohrbach Inn.. Sharpsburg.. Elmwood Farm Bed & Breakfast.. Williamsport.. Inn at Red Hill.. Keedysville.. Inn BoonsBoro On the Square.. Boonsboro.. Stoney Creek Farm.. The Inn At Antietam.. info@marylandmemories.. org..

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