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    Archived pages: 42 . Archive date: 2014-01.

  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: .. Contact Us.. |.. FAQs.. HOME.. ABOUT US.. Overview.. Organisation Structure.. Partners.. NETWORKING.. Advocacy.. Working Groups.. LAND.. Overview.. Policy and Legal Framework.. Land Rights.. Land Tenure Systems.. Access to Land.. HOUSING.. Housing Rights.. Housing Finance.. Building Materials.. Housing Coorperatives.. ISSUES.. HIV/AIDS.. Gender.. Environment.. PROGRAMS.. COMMUNITY FACILITIES.. Informal Settlements.. Water and Sanitation.. Solid Waste Mgt.. MEMBERSHIP.. Member Profiles and Links.. Becoming a Member.. Minister PLEDGES Land for Adequate Housing.. KASOKOSO: Owner versus Occupiers!.. High rental charges choking tenants.. Urban-based poor to get land -Updates from joint Media Breakfast Meeting organized by SSA-UHSNET and UCA:HCDP.. Shelter and Settlements Alternatives: Uganda Human Settlements Network (SSA:UHSNET) is  ...   and sharing information for better policies, programs and practices towards sustainable improvement of human settlements in Uganda.. Currently, Uganda is experiencing a high rate of urbanization exceeding 5% per annum.. This is attributed to high rural urban migration rate, the high natural population growth in urban areas, extension of boundaries of urban centres and uncontrolled growth and expansion of trading centres overtime.. Due to inadequacies in planning, management and provision of basic urban infrastructure an.. More.. 2014 Shelter and settlements Alternatives: Uganda Human Settlements Network - SSA/UHSNET.. Home.. |.. About Us.. Networking.. Land.. Housing.. Community Facilities.. Programs.. Membership.. Contact Us.. :.. Powered by:.. BitWork..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: You are Here:.. Shelter Settlements Alternatives: Uganda Human Settlements Network (SSA:UHSNET).. Plot 2140, Old Kiira Road, Bukoto;.. (Near Honey Bears Pre-school); Flat D;.. P.. O.. Box 27445, Kampala, Uganda.. Office Tel: +256-312-290 270.. Tel: +256-414-530-685.. Email:.. ssa.. uganda@gmail.. com.. Website:.. www.. ssauganda.. org.. Click.. here.. to view a map of our location.. COMMENTS / INQUIRES.. First Name.. *.. Last Name.. Email Address.. Phone Number.. Comment(s).. *..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: About Us.. FAQs.. Frequently Asked Questions.. Q- How do I become a member of SSA: UHSNET?.. A - We invite all individuls and organizations that have an interest in land, housing and human settlements to join our Network.. To become a member please visit our Membership page, where you can learn more about the benefits and download the application form.. Q- Where in Uganda does SSA: UHSNET work?.. A - SSA: UHSNET is a national organization with members from across the country.. Our offices our located in Kampala but our scope, through our members, reaches well outside of Central Region.. We are always looking for new members in areas outside of Kampala to join.. To see a list of our members, please visit our  ...   out of Shelter and Settlement Alterantive which was founded in 1999.. The Uganda Human Settlements Network began operation in 2009.. Q- How do I access you library and resources?.. A - SSA:UHSNET has 2 libraries.. In its offices in Bukoto it has a resource center where members are free to access materials.. Non-members also allowed to look at the materials while in the office.. The second library is an electronic library or an e-library which you can access though our the homepage of our website or by clicking.. here.. Here you can find uptodate reports from around the sector on issues pertinent to the human settlements sector in Uganda, and beyond.. Q- How often do you publish your newsletter?.. A- The newsletter is published semi-annually..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: About SSA:UHSNET.. Organizational Background.. Vision.. Mission.. Objectives.. Key areas of concern.. Strategic Plan 2012-2016.. ABOUT SSA:UHSNET.. Shelter and Settlements Alternatives: Uganda Human Settlements Network (SSA:UHSNET) is a Network of civil society organisations, communities, individuals, and private sector working together with the main purpose of lobbying, advocating and sharing information for better policies, programs and practices towards sustainable improvement of human settlements in Uganda.. SSA/UHSNET seeks to address the challenge of networking, based on the recognition that there are several stakeholders operating in the human settlements sector in Uganda, contributing to access to one or several aspects of adequate housing such as access to water sanitation or security of tenure, who lack an organised voice to effectively address constraints to adequate housing especially for urban slum dwellers.. ORGANIZATIONAL BACKGROUND.. Shelter and settlements Alternatives was established in 1999 by a group of eminent Ugandans brought together by a shared concern for the poor state of human settlements across the country.. In 2008, a group of stakeholders in the human settlements sector in Uganda, drawn from civil society, academia, professionals associations, communities and the private sector have been working closely together in an effort to form a national human settlements network.. Governments at both central and local levels as well as relevant development partners were also included in the initiative.. The initiative, which started in February 2008 was conceived and spearheaded by Shelter Settlements Alternatives (SSA), who have been involved in information dissemination and networking in the sector since.. In May 2010 following a workshop held with stakeholders,  ...   is a nation with accessible decent human settlements for all.. OUR MISSION.. SSA/UHSNET mission is to address issues and challenges affecting human settlements in Uganda, through advocacy, networking and information sharing.. SSA/UHSNET OBJECTIVES:.. The main objectives of the Network are to:.. Create awareness, Lobby and Advocate for issues and challenges that affect human settlements in Uganda.. Ensure effective participation of all stakeholders on issues pertinent to human settlements in Uganda.. To take an active interest in civic, cultural, social and moral welfare of the community with specific regard to human settlements.. Mobilize resources for improving living conditions of urban slum dwellers in Uganda.. Mobilize stakeholders and ensure effective participation in formulation, implementation and revision of policies and laws affecting human.. settlements.. Work with Government, its agencies and institutions; national, regional and international NGOs, CSOs or other organizations so as to obtain assistance as may be deemed desirable to address issues and challenges in the Human settlements sector.. KEY PRIORITY AREAS OF CONCERN.. Research and Documentation;.. Networking, Advocacy and Lobbying;.. Sharing Information and Experiences;.. Community Mobilization and Empowerment;.. Capacity building;.. Consultancy.. The Network has set four main strategic objectives encompassing service delivery and institutional sustainability.. SO1: To influence Government and other stakeholders commitment to effective implementation of local, national, regional and international commitments to adequate housing;.. SO2: To enhance community participation in human settlement decisions and actions which affect them;.. SO3: To strengthen the performance effectiveness and sustainability of Member Institutions;.. SO4: To strengthen the sustainability of the Network.. The Strategic Plan 2012-2016 can be found..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Organisation Structure.. Organisational Structure.. General Assembly:.. The General Assembly is the supreme Governing body of the Network and comprises of all SSA/ UHSNET members.. The General Assembly determines the strategic direction of the Network and elects the Network Board.. SSA/UHSNET Board:.. The Network Board is the overall overseer of the functioning of SSA/USHNET.. The 13 member Board comprises of the following: Chairperson;.. Vice Chairperson; Alternate Vice Chairperson; General Secretary; Alternate General Secretary; Treasurer; Alternate Treasurer and 6 Board Members..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Partners..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Home.. This section is yet to be populated, please check back later..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Networking.. Networking Overview.. Networking Overview.. The idea to form a Network in Uganda was born out of the recognition that there are several stakeholders in the sector contributing to access to one or more aspects of adequate human settlements.. Furthermore, that the challenge of promoting adequate human settlements for all calls for effective partnerships between government, the private sector, civil society, development partners and the communities themselves.. In 2008- 2009, a group of stakeholders in the human settlements sector in Uganda, drawn from civil society, academia, professionals associations, communities and the private sector With  ...   conceived and spearheaded by Shelter Settlements Alternatives (SSA), who have been involved in information dissemination and networking in the sector.. The Network s mandate is to provide a credible forum for discussion of human settlements issues and challenges and promote formulation of an enabling policy environment for mobilization of technical and financial resources required to provide decent, affordable and well planned human settlements for Ugandans, with particular focus on low income slum dwellers.. Its membership is comprised of 20 institutions spanning not-for-profit, government as well as private sector institutions, 10 individual professional and 5 students..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Advocacy.. The Network acts as a platform for stakeholders in the human settlements sector to lobby and advocate for adequate housing for all Ugandans.. Through the working groups of the Network including Land and housing working group, water, sanitation and environment working group and gender and HIV AIDS working group, the network has been able to engage government and make contribution and recommendations on different policies and regulations that guide the sector.. The Working Groups compiled a number of issues and made recommendations on housing policy draft, which were forwarded to the Ministry of Land Housing and Urban Development.. Recommendation for the housing policy.. Need to set up a housing authority to champion low cost housing for low income earners.. Creation of positions for Housing Officer at each local council, responsible adequate housing  ...   building materials and reduction of taxes on local building materials.. Government to prioritise Housing as an important sector and indicator for economic development.. Government should set up a housing fund for low income earners as a way of mobilizing resources for housing the poor.. Strengthening enforcement and sensitization on property ownership by creating awareness on the existing land and housing laws and regulations.. Government should set up a slum upgrading fund within the Ministry of Finance.. Government should partner with private companies by providing subsides on provision and maintenance of infrastructure services.. Develop a Housing Act to regulate and guide implementation of the policy.. Stakeholders recommended that the policy should also clearly state the roles of all relevant actors.. Government should take direct action/ active part in development of housing units through local councils..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Working Groups.. One of the approaches used by the Network to Lobby and advocate for creation of access to adequate and affordable housing is through the working groups.. The key mandate of the working groups is to analyze relevant policies and subsequently repackage them for dissemination to target slum dwelling populations, and finally those target populations taking the lead in advocating for their rights from relevant government organs, as well as being aware of entry points existing in various policies and programs so that they can step up their participation.. The working groups comprise of members of the Network and they include land and housing working group; water, sanitation and Environment working group; Gender and HIV/AIDS working group.. TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR NETWORK WORKING GROUPS.. Land and Housing Working Group.. Water, Sanitation, Environment and Climate Change Working Group.. Gender and HIV/AIDS Working Group.. 1.. LAND AND HOUSING WORKING GROUP.. Identify key issues and challenges regarding land and housing in Uganda.. Audit, analyse policy and legal environment (international conventions/instruments, national local legislation by-laws relevant to land and housing.. Develop and disseminate position papers, policy briefs popular versions on issues pertinent to land and Housing in urban slums i.. e.. land and housing rights, tenure security, building materials, housing finance, infrastructure services, HIV/AIDS Gender etc.. Work with community settlements teams and network members to identify information needs and areas for capacity building on land and housing issues and work with the Secretariat to organise for the same.. Organise sensitisation and awareness creation workshops for the network members and communities on land and housing issues in urban slums.. Take the lead in facilitating forums between the public, community, private sector,  ...   and Gender etc.. Work with community settlements teams and network members to identify information needs and areas for capacity building and work with the Secretariat to organise for the same.. Organise sensitisation and awareness creation workshops for the network members and communities on water, sanitation environment issues.. Take the lead in facilitating forums between the public, community, private sector, government and CSOs for engagement and dialogue on relevant laws and other issues pertinent water, sanitation environment particularly for urban slums.. Identify events relevant to water, sanitation Environment and take the lead in preparing the network to effectively participate.. Take the lead in building a wealth of knowledge on water, sanitation environment issues.. 3.. GENDER AND HIV/AIDS WORKING GROUP.. Identify key issues and challenges regarding Gender and HIV/AIDS in Uganda.. Audit, analyse policy and legal environment (international conventions/instruments, national local legislation by-laws relevant to Gender and HIV/AIDS.. Develop and disseminate position papers, policy briefs popular versions the link between Gender, HIV/AIDS and human settlements.. Organise sensitisation and awareness creation workshops for the network members and communities on Gender HIV/AIDS.. Take the lead in facilitating forums between the public, community, private sector, government and CSOs for engagement and dialogue on relevant laws and other issues pertinent to Gender and HIV/AIDS in human settlements.. Identify relevant events and take the lead in preparing the network to effectively participate.. Link with other working groups in identifying integrated initiatives for exposure visits and participate in facilitating communities to develop action plans for replication of good practices to ensure mainstreaming of Gender HIV/AIDS issues.. Link/monitor other working groups to ensure that Gender and HIV/AIDS issues are prioritised within their agenda.. Back to Top..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Land section.. SA:UHSNET recognises the fact that.. the first essential condition for a vibrant and well-functioning housing sector is the availability of residential land, in ample supply and at affordable prices.. The network is working closely with other stakeholders in the sector to lobby and advocate for access to land for adequate shelter for vulnerable groups through building capacity of such groups to understand and articulate their rights to land and housing, facilitate engagement with key players involved in the issue, suggest interventions that would more effectively address the problem and generating awareness of the issues facing communities without formal access to land in urban areas.. Land is highly volatile and political issue.. In Uganda, land continues to be a critical area, as it is an essential pillar for both human life and national development.. The land question in Uganda has origins in the legacy of colonialism, wherein historical injustices deprived some communities of their ancestral lands that resulted in multiplicity of tenure regimes, multiple rights and interests overlapping on the same piece of land, and a heritage of evictions, arbitrary dispossession, land disputes and conflicts.. Major land reform in Uganda was attempted in 1975, during the time of President Idi Amin, who issued a ruling called.. The Land Reform Decree.. that declared all land to be public and vested the State with the power to hold land in trust for the people of Uganda, thus all land being administered by the Uganda Land Commission.. It also abolished the Mailo system of land tenure and converted them into leaseholds of 99 years.. These were then vested to public bodies and to 999 years where individuals held these.. Although the Decree was not fully implemented, it persisted until 1995 when a new constitution was enacted, which reinstated the old tenure systems and.. gave land ownership back to the citizens of Uganda.. with the following land tenure systems: customary, freehold, Mailo and leasehold.. The Government also has also formulated a National Land Policy, through a widely consultative process.. Policy proposals in this draft of the National Land Policy, among other things, seeks to re-orient the land sector in national development by articulating management co-ordination between the land sector and other productive areas to enhance the contribution of the sector to social and economic development of the country.. The policy also recognizes the fact that Uganda has no human settlements and urbanization policy to guide the sector and proposes the need for government to formulate these policies in order to undertake a comprehensive plan for orderly and sustainable development.. Policy and legal framework (under the section of land).. Constitution.. The 1995 constitution of Uganda abolished the land reform decree and re-stated the systems of customary land tenure, freehold tenure, leasehold tenure and Mailo tenure.. It also made new and radical changes in the relationship between the state and land ownership in Uganda it declared that land in Uganda would henceforth belong to the citizens of Uganda.. In the Constitution it is stated:.. Land in Uganda belongs to the citizens of Uganda and shall vest in them in accordance with the following land tenure systems-customary, freehold, mailo and leasehold [Article 237].. The Constitution sets out quite detailed provisions in relation to land rights, while leaving other provisions to be determined by.. subsequent legislation.. It permits the Government, or a local government body, to acquire land in the public interest, subject to the provisions of Article 26 of the Constitution, which protects people from being arbitrarily deprived of their property rights.. Article 26 states:.. Every person has a right to own property either individually or in association with others.. [Article 26 [1].. Uganda National land policy.. The Government embarked on the process of formulating a National Land Policy through a widely consultative process.. The vision of the policy is: ".. Sustainable and optimal use of land and land based-resources for the transformation of the Uganda society and the economy.. ".. The goal of the policy is to: ".. Ensure efficient, equitable utilization and sustainable utilization and management of Uganda s land and land based resources for poverty reduction, wealth creation and overall social economic development.. The policy came at a time were land conflicts began occurring and have now ensued and are spreading nationwide, which includes massive eviction of people from land and increased dispossession of rights holders.. Objectives of the National Land Policy, among others, include:.. Stimulate the contribution of the land sector to overall socio economic development, wealth creation and poverty reduction in Uganda;.. Ensure planned, environmentally friendly, affordable and orderly development of human settlements for both rural and urban areas, including infrastructure development;.. Reform and streamline land rights administration to ensure efficient, effective and equitable delivery of land services;.. Harmonize all land related laws, and strengthen institutional capacity at all level of Government and cultural institutions for sustainable management of land resources.. The 1998 Land Act.. The Land Act came into force in 1998, following five years of vigorous and controversial debate.. Most of its provisions had been previously mentioned in the Constitution and the law was intended to give them practical effect.. The two most important issues covered by the Land Act are ownership and tenure rights and land administration.. While the previous Land Reform Decree of 1975 had sought to increase control over land by the central government and make tenure conditional on the land s development, the Land Act of 1998 is part of a very different policy.. It expressly limits government owned land to that which was being used by the Government when the Constitution of 1995 came into force.. It stipulates that if the Government requires additional land it must purchase this, either from a willing seller or through compulsory acquisition in accordance with the rights to private property contained in the Constitution.. The Land Act also upholds the constitution s support for women and girls property rights by stating in Article 27 that any decision made on customary  ...   a tenure that derives its legality from the Constitution and the written law.. Freehold tenure may involve either a grant of land in perpetuity, or for a lesser specified time period.. The Act specifies that the holder of land in freehold has full power of ownership of it.. This means that he or she may use it for any lawful purpose and sell, rent, lease, dispose of it by will or transact it in any other way as he or she sees fit.. Only citizens of Uganda are entitled to own land under freehold tenure.. Non-citizens may lease it for a period up to 99 years.. Leasehold tenure.. is a form of tenure whereby one party grants to another the right to exclusive possession of land for a specified period, usually in exchange for the payment of rent.. Any owner of land in Uganda whether through freehold, Mailo or customary tenure may grant a lease to another person.. In practice, much of the land that is leased was previously owned by government bodies, particularly the Land Commission and the District Land Boards, and these tend to impose some development conditions on the land s subsequent use.. The Land Act 1998 treats.. Mailo tenure.. almost identically to freehold tenure.. Registered land can be held in perpetuity and a Mailo owner is entitled to enjoy all the powers of a freehold owner.. The only significant difference is that Mailo owners should not use these powers against the interests of customary tenants, bona fide or lawful occupants.. This provision was introduced due to concern at the possible mass eviction of thousands of people who were occupying Mailo land, as customary tenants or squatters, at the time when the Act was passed.. One of the most innovative aspects of the Land Act 1998 is in the recognition it gives to those who hold their land under.. customary tenure.. With the exception of land in Buganda (which is mainly held under Mailo) and urban areas (where it is held under freehold, or leasehold) most land in Uganda is held under customary tenure.. The 1995 Constitution restored recognition of the rights of those who held such land and the Land Act explicitly recognized that customary law should regulate this form of land tenure.. There are a number of different types of customary land tenure in different parts of Uganda.. In some places the land is held communally, in some it belongs to a particular clan while in others it is held by individuals.. The rules of customary law also vary in different parts of the country.. The Land Act 1998 states that customary land tenure shall be governed by rules generally accepted as binding by the particular community.. Anyone who acquires land in that community shall also be bound by the same rules.. The exceptions to this are that no custom is permitted which is repugnant to natural justice, equity and good conscience, or being incompatible either directly or indirectly with any written law.. Access to land for housing.. Secure access to land is critical to improving livelihoods of poor people in regard to production and access to decent shelter.. In Uganda notably in urban communities land markets are facing enormous competition and this is driving up the cost of housing to the point where even the most minimal standard of informal sector housing is unaffordable to the poor.. Limited access to land and poor tenure systems has led to increasing illegal settlements in form of slums mostly in poor drained areas since most poor people in urban areas is an option they can afford.. There is need to put up mechanisms for these groups to be able to access land for decent shelter.. Some of the ways in which different stakeholders in the sector can explore in this regard include:.. Land Expropriation;.. Most countries have legislation that enables governments to purchase or expropriate private land in the interest of the community at large, either at or below market prices, which they can use to enhance the supply of affordable land.. Land Banking;.. This is primarily used to acquire public or private land for development in advance of need at relatively cheap cost.. It can be used to contain land speculation, redistribute land to the poor, and finance infrastructure investments.. However, hers is also risk that it may generate land scarcity, causing land prices to raise and, consequently, increased informal land and housing development.. Land sharing;.. This typically involves the owner of the land occupied by a slum or informal settlement being given incentives to lease or sell part of their property to the occupants [squatters or tenants] below market price.. The land owner then develops the most economically attractive part of the land.. In this way, land sharing brings gains to both parties.. Land readjustment;.. This entails land ownership and land use of fragmented adjoining sites being re-arranged to provide land for development purposes, e.. g.. slum upgrading or planned hosing development.. It often includes negotiated and participatory solutions, and has the potential to work as a self financing technique.. Incremental land development strategies;.. Allowing people to settle on subserviced land and infrastructure to be installed incrementally, over time can increase the supply of affordable land for housing.. Transfer of Development Rights [TDR];.. This can be used to generate low income housing on high value urban land through the participation of private land owners and developers.. It works where land is at premium and where permitted densities for residential development are high enough to leave surplus land after building low income housing.. Resettlement;.. This is commonly used where governments want to enhance the use of land where slums have developed.. however, it generally creates more problems than it solves, especially following forced evictions and demolition of slums, which destroys a substantial stock of conveniently located hosing which is affordable to the urban poor as well as livelihoods.. It should therefore be avoided, unless absolutely necessary or justifiable..

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  • Archived pages: 42