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    Archived pages: 42 . Archive date: 2014-01.

  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: You are Here:.. Issues.. Issues Overview.. Issues Overview.. Still Under Construction..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: HIV/AIDS.. Introduction to HIV/AIDS in Uganda.. Uganda, one of the first countries in sub-Saharan Africa to experience the devastating impact of HIV/AIDS and to take action to control the epidemic, is one of the rare success stories in a region that has been ravaged by the HIV/AIDS epidemic.. While the rate of new infections continues to increase in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda has succeeded in lowering its very high infection rates.. Since 1993, HIV infection rates among pregnant women, a key indicator of the progress of the epidemic, have been more than halved in some areas and infection rates among men seeking treatment for sexually transmitted infections have dropped by over a third.. Success in reducing the prevalence of HIV in Uganda is the result of a broad-based national effort backed up by firm political commitment, including the personal involvement of the head of state, President Yoweri Museveni.. From the outset, the government involved religious and traditional leaders, community groups, NGOs, and all sectors of society, forging a consensus around the need to contain the escalating spread of HIV and provide care and support for those affected.. In Uganda, as elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, AIDS has caused immense human suffering over the past two decades -- setting back development and reducing life expectancy.. Over 1.. 5 million children have been orphaned since the epidemic began -- losing their mother  ...   home of PLWHA.. HIV-positive slum residents face substantial stigma and discrimination.. This stigma only increases the economic crisis for positive residents, who are left without enough money to secure their housing, medical bills, school fees and food.. Health workers also face difficulties carrying out home visits for slum dwellers, especially during the rainy season when accessibility is very difficult due to flooding, which increases infections and limits patient outreach.. HIV-positive slum residents are more vulnerable to issues of housing instability because they are often unable to work due to their medical condition, and thus cannot save enough money to move into better shelter.. Most positive residents save the little money they have for medical treatment and thus the only dwellings affordable are slum dwellings.. Some HIV-positive residents fear that they may leave their families in worse housing conditions upon their death, which leads them to remain in the slums in order to save money to leave for their families.. Most HIV-positive slum dwellers, like all slum tenants, lack collateral security.. They cannot borrow money from the bank or individual money lenders, and so their hopes of getting better housing are limited.. Some cannot join saving cooperatives because they do not have the startup capital.. Lack of housing finance and security invokes anxiety, sometimes to the point of suicide.. For further information on HIV/AIDS and Housing please visit our e-library by clicking.. here..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Women and HIV/AIDS.. Women have traditionally been disproportionately impacted by and economically vulnerable to HIV/AIDS and poverty for several reasons.. For example, women typically play the role of caregivers (to produce children and provide labor) and, therefore, it is difficult for them to travel to access water sources and sanitation facilities because they need to stay home to care for their children and the sick.. Often if they cannot afford the cost of a jerry can of water or cannot access other sources, women must rely on water accumulated on the roofs of their homes where waste is also thrown.. Women are often blamed for bringing disease into the home, regardless of whether it was their male spouse who infected the family.. As a result, women avoid disclosing their HIV status and do not seek treatment for fear of facing stigma and discrimination, causing them to be at increased risk for contracting opportunistic infections and falling ill to an earlier death.. In many cases, women who are afflicted with HIV are isolated by the stigma of the disease and, as a result, lack productive work opportunities or must travel long distances to work where their status is unknown to their employer.. Similarly, HIV positive women face increased difficulty accessing microfinance credit due to stigmas and discrimination.. Women are the poorest group in Uganda because they are not well educated and cannot be employed or earn income in the monetary economy, which prevents them from acquiring and/or accessing basic goods and services.. Women need  ...   being HIV positive.. Women easily fall victim to a cycle of poverty and are more dependent on men when they are tied to their husband s family and have no alternative place to live or source for cash.. Even with the inclusion of the consent clause in the Land Act whereby women/wives need to consent to their husband selling their land or homes, there is a lack of clarity concerning the definition of a wife, which often does not protect common law spouses, etc.. One stakeholder noted that the most dangerous phrases used today in land cases are: Women do not have rights under customary tenure and Customary tenure does not allow women to own land , which are both false claims (women do have rights to land under customary law by right of being wives and family/clan members).. Given that there is no firm system for land succession in patrilineal societies practicing customary law, these statements create more vulnerability for women (particularly for widows, women living with HIV/AIDS, and divorced mothers) who are already economically vulnerable to eviction and land grabbing by economically stronger groups including men, the educated, the rich, and those in positions of power.. While the Domestic Relations Bill was drafted to ensure the legislation of equality for women and has been presented in Parliament, it has not yet been debated and is unlikely that it will pass with its initial comprehensive resolutions.. For further information on housing and land issues regarding gender please visit our e-library by clicking..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Home.. Page Still underconstruction..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Research and Documentation.. Networking, Advocacy and Lobbying.. Community Moblization and Empowerment.. Capacity Building.. 1.. Coming Soon!.. 2.. Shelter and Settlements Alternatives: Uganda Human Settlements Network (SSA:UHSNET).. The Network is national membership organization with members from CSOs, Individual professionals and institutions and was formed mainly to address lack capacity of slum dwelling communities and stakeholders working in the sector to influence policies and practices for improvement of human settlements conditions in Uganda.. SSA:UHSNET s mandate is to provide a credible forum for discussion of human settlements issues and challenges and promote formulation of an enabling policy environment for mobilization of technical and financial resources required to provide decent, affordable and well planned human settlements for Ugandans, with particular focus on low income slum dwellers.. SSA:UHSNET is currently implementing a three year project (2010 2012) titled Strengthening the Human Settlements Network towards Improving Conditions of Slum Dwellers in Uganda.. The project, whose main objective is an empowered network, influencing policies, programmes and practices for sustainable improvement of human settlements , is funded by the Swedish Cooperative Centre and partly by Rooftops Canada.. The project seeks to address the lack of capacity of slum dwelling communities and stakeholders working in the sector to influence policies, practices for improvement of human settlements.. Project Summary.. Human settlements is a multi-faceted sector comprising aspects of land and physical planning, housing and appropriate technology, water and sanitation, finance, infrastructure and services as well as the cross-cutting issues of Gender, HIV/AIDS, and Environment and Climate Change.. There are several stakeholders in the sector in Uganda contributing to access to one or several aspects of adequate housing such as access to water and sanitation or access to security of tenure.. Building on already established roles of networking and information dissemination, Shelter and Settlements Alternatives: Uganda  ...   include organizational development to strengthen the capacity of the network, secretariat and its membership.. Their capacity will be enhanced in the areas of implementation, leadership, management of their own organizations, governance and accountability.. Another approach is Lobbying and advocacy, which will include using Working Groups to analyse relevant policies and subsequently repackage them for dissemination to target slum dwelling populations, and finally those target populations taking the lead in advocating for their rights from relevant government organs, as well as being aware of entry points existing in various policies and programs so that they can step up their participation.. The project also entails Mainstreaming of cross-cutting issues to ensure that network members are aware of the impact of gender, HIV/AIDS and environment on access to adequate housing and are consciously addressing them in their plans and programs.. 3.. Community Mobilization and Empowerment.. More Project Information Coming Soon!.. One project currently underway is the solar bulb project.. Working in three areas across Kampala, the solar bulb project is bringing light to residents of slums who otherwise would continue to live in darkness 24 hours a day.. To read more about it click.. 4.. Capacity Building.. In 2010 SSA:UHSNET carried out a baseline study on its members to identify capacity building gaps to guide the capacity building programme.. the study was able to identify the following capacity needs among others, training in policy analysis and advocacy skills, training in resource mobilisation, training in leadership and organisation development, training in financial management and training in Gender and HIV/AIDS mainstreaming.. With efforts to address these capacity needs SSA:UHSNET was able to conduct the following trainings for Network Members.. Leadership and Governance.. Networking, Lobbying and Advocacy.. Policy.. Financial management and resource mobilisation.. TOT for Gender and HIV/AIDs.. Organisational developments.. Back to Top..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Community Overview.. Community Overview..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Solid Waste.. INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS STATISTICS, SLUMS, HOUSING SITUATION.. Introduction.. Uganda s population has been growing at an annual rate of 3.. 2% to the current 30 million people while the urban areas have registered an annual rate of 5.. 1%.. At this rate, Uganda will have a population of about 68 millions by 2035, 30% of which will be in the urban areas.. Uganda is among the top 10 countries with the highest fertility rates and the third highest rate of natural population increase in the world.. A stable macroeconomic environment, sustained high population growth rates and huge dividends from the liberalization policy translated into impressive poverty reduction during the 1990s and the early 2000s, income-poverty headcount fell from 56% in 1992/93 to 34% in 1999/2000 and then rose to 38% in 2002/03 but declined again to 31 % in 2005/06, however the incidence of income poverty in urban areas rose from 9.. 6% in 2000 to 12.. 2% in 2006 The poverty levels in the urban areas have remained the same over the two survey years at 14%.. The current urban population in Uganda is about 3.. 23 million people.. Applying some of the UN-Habitat slum definition attributes to results and findings of empirical studies, or surveys shows that the number of slum residents is 49% to 64% of the total urban population, which gives a total of 1.. 58 million people to 2.. 1 million people as slum residents in Uganda.. All estimates fall within this range of slum populations, for instance, using the state of housing as a defining attribute, results from the 2005/06 National Household Survey indicates that tenements ( muzigo which is the typical housing structure for slum area) accounted for 64.. 3% of the dwelling units in Kampala.. Taking the attribute of living space, the survey further shows that the percentage of overcrowded dwellings in Uganda (i.. e.. with more than 2 persons per room) is 49% in the urban compared to 56% in the rural.. According to Action Aid International,  ...   income earners and the poor to be catered for by the informal sector.. This has partly contributed to the spontaneous growth of informal settlements.. According to the Uganda Population and Housing Census (2002), the housing conditions were generally substandard: nationally more than 70% of the dwelling units were built out of temporary building materials that cannot maintain their stability for more than three years, urban areas account for 27% of these while 60% are built of permanent materials.. Overall, 48.. 8% of the dwelling units are overcrowded; more than 56% of the dwelling units were occupied by tenants compared to about 30% which were owner occupiers.. Results from the slum profiling study (2008), that informed this situation analysis, it was found that in all the four sampled slums, 39.. 9% of the houses were permanent, 31.. 6% were semi permanent while 28.. 5% were temporary.. Owner occupiers accounted for 22% (only 64% of these owned the land on which the house was situated), while rentals were 75% as the form of accessing housing.. The cost of rental per unit (size 3feet x 4 feet) varied between Uganda shillings 15,000/= to 30,000/= per month.. Most of the slum houses are predominantly single-room commonly known as muzigo , a local description of a tenement.. These structures are built in such a way that there is virtually no space between them.. Clusters of shelters are just separated by a corridor or verandah.. In this type of housing, a single room acts as a bedroom, sitting room, store and so on.. Pathetically, four people and in some circumstances more than four may share a single room.. Where some houses have some space, which passes for a compound, in the strict sense of the term they are actually more of public paths and mini playgrounds than compounds.. The foundation of the dwelling units is poor, leading to many houses assuming slanting postures, without ventilators and characterized by breaking walls and wearing away.. For more information on informal settlements in Uganda click.. here..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Water and Sanitation.. The Ugandan water supply and sanitation sector has made spectacular progress in urban areas since the mid-1990s, with substantial increases in coverage as well as in operational and commercial performance.. Sector reforms in the period 1998-2003 included the commercialization and modernization of the National Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) operating in cities and larger towns, as well as decentralization and private sector participation in small towns.. These reforms have attracted significant international attention.. However, 40% of the population still had no access to an improved water source and 57% had no improved sanitation in 2004.. Low access to urban sanitation and wastewater treatment, compared to the progress achieved on urban water supply, is an area of concern.. The water and sanitation sector has been recognized as a key area under the 2004 Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP), Uganda's main strategy paper to fight poverty.. A comprehensive expenditure framework has been introduced to coordinate financial support by external donors, the national government, and NGOs.. The PEAP estimates that from 2001 to 2015, about US$1.. 4 billion, or US$92 million per year, are needed to increase water supply coverage up to 95%.. Legal and policy framework.. The framework comprises of a set of policies and laws the most notable of which include:.. The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda [1995].. National Water Policy, (1999).. Water Statute, (1995).. National Water and Sewerage Corporation Statute, (1995).. National Environment Act, (1995).. Water Abstraction Wastewater Discharge Regulations, (1998.. ).. Local Government Act, (1997).. Land Act, (1998).. The National Environment (Conduct and Certification of Environment Practitioners) Regulations (2003).. Community Issues.. Access to clean water for slum dwellers.. Access to sanitary facilities for slum dwellers.. Water quality issues.. Provides for the protection of water sources, protection and preservation of the environment and allows for measures to promote good water management to prevent or minimize damage or destruction to air, land, water resources resulting from pollution and other causes.. The Water Act provides for a number of activities, which should be implemented in order to protect, manage and sustain water sources and developments as guided by the objectives.. The policy direction for water quality management is guided towards protection of the public health, ecosystem integrity and enhanced human resources and social economic development.. The legislative framework for protection of water sources, water contamination quality testing and monitoring is also embedded in the Water Act and is guided by National Water policy [NWP] 1999.. Standards and guides for water quality management in Uganda include the National Standards for Drinking Water [potable],(1994), World Health Organisation [WHO] Guidelines 1998 with due consideration to specific weather conditions and water use habits, national effluent standards for discharge of waste water into the environment , and a Provisional Water Quality Guidelines [1996] for untreated rural water supplies.. At operational level, activities with impacts on water quality are regulated through a range of authorizations, which are either being directly managed by the DWD, or in co-operation with NEMA.. Licensing of water abstraction and waste discharge is based on the Water Act, (cap 152:2000); The National Environment Act (cap.. 153:2000); The Water Resources Regulations, (1998) and The Water [waste discharge] Regulations, (1998).. Issuing of disposal site permits in the Environment Act,( cap.. 150:2000); and Waste Management Regulations, (1999).. Recommendation for approval of environmental impact assessments [EIA s] in the national Environment Act, (cap.. 150:2000) and also the NWP, (1999).. The water Act (cap 152) provides for self regulation of permit holders.. The National Water Policy (NWP), adopted in 1999, provides the overall policy framework for the water sector.. The policy also emphasizes the recognition of water as being both a social and economic good, whose allocation should give first priority to domestic use.. The National Gender Policy, (1999) which recognizes women and children as the main carriers and users of water.. It anchors the importance of gender responsiveness in terms of planning, implementation and management of water and sanitation initiatives.. The Health Policy which reiterates that sanitation lies within the mandate of the health ministry, and notes that the war against poor sanitation has to  ...   quite poor, and find it more difficult to pay for water services.. Piped water is mainly provided in the wealthier and well planned core areas of towns, unlike the urban fringe areas, which usually comprise of informal settlements occupied by poorer people, many in make shift accommodation.. These informal settlements, mostly access water from improved point water sources (protected springs or boreholes/shallow wells with hand pumps).. Where piped water reaches the slums most people access it from stand taps (kiosks) or yard connections for a price.. It is difficult to provide sewers in slum areas because of their land requirements, particularly in the poorly planned areas, and high costs of construction and maintenance.. The maintenance costs would make the resultant tariffs unrealistically high and not affordable.. Many people depend on on-site sanitation, predominantly pit latrines, which has contributed to ground water contamination, especially in Kampala.. In order to address this problem, the Ministry of Health and Kampala City Council Authority are promoting ecological sanitation by emphasizing the use of dry toilets in urban areas that do not use the conventional sewerage system.. There are poor sanitary facilities in all urban centres in Uganda and these conditions result in increased risk of pathogenic contamination and epidemics.. Increased incidence of water borne diseases such as cholera ,dysentery, and typhoid have been recorded across the country.. It s reported that annually over 80,000 cases a registered with these kind of diseases, in addition, there are many unreported cases.. This situation clearly indicates the need for improved access to safe water and sanitation.. Another issue of great importance is the increased levels of nutrients and organic matter from urban and industrial point sources, resulting in eutrophication problems and oxygen deficiencies.. Recent measurements of bio chemical oxygen demand loads from the major towns served by NWSC in Uganda showed that the established standards for discharge of BOD were exceeded most of the time in the period from 2003 to 2005.. Measurements from Murchison Bay in 1996 and 1997 showed that the chlorophyll level had increased 4-5 times in that period.. The presence of opportunistic species such as water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and duck weed (lemna species) in many Ugandan water bodies clearly indicates water quality problems.. Observations of oxygen depletion reduced light conditions and fish deaths underline the harmful effects of eutrophication on the aquatic eco system.. Besides having an impact on the water use for the aquatic environment, the presence of blue-green algae is a danger to public health because some species are toxic.. Such effects can make surface water inadequate for human and animal consumption and result in increased costs of production in water treatment.. The main industrial activities in Uganda are primarily concentrated in Kampala, Jinja, Mbale, Entebbe, Kasese and Mbarara.. The major industrial polluters include breweries, textile factories, sugar factories, food processing, metal factories, paints, oil, soap and leather tanning industries.. Under the water quality component of Lake Victoria environment project (LVEMP) it was estimated that the amount of of BOD, total nitrogen (TN) flowing from the major Ugnadan industrial points into Lake Victoria per day was 2455kg and 126kg per day of phosphorous (TP In addition to the major industrial activities, there are a number of cottage and semi-industrial activities (battery manufacturers, garages, fuel stations, local gin (enguli) distillers, etc.. ) which may affect the water quality in the vicinity of their location and other water bodies.. The industries are poorly regulated and most lack pre treatment facilities for their wastewater.. This situation can lead to unacceptable levels of toxic substances, organic pollution and nutrients in the receiving water bodies.. Moreover, poor waste management of solid and liquid wastes, wrongful dumping in wetlands, especially by urban authorities, have led to pollution of surface and underground water bodies.. Previously, the significance of these pollution sources has been considered as relatively low due to the generally low economic activity.. However, the magnitude of the industrial pollution is relatively unknown and with continued economic growth, water quality impacts from industrial activities will be an issue of high importance at the local and national level..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Solid Wastes Management.. Solid waste management and disposal.. Urban Domestic Waste Management is drawing increasing attention, as citizens observe that too much garbage is lying uncollected in the streets, dustbins, causing inconvenience and environmental pollution, and being a risk to public health.. Although government authorities apply all the means at their disposal, the piles of wastes only seem to grow.. In Kampala city alone domestic waste generation rates range between 0.. 5kg and 1.. 1kg per capita per day.. The population of Kampala City and its suburbs is estimated at 1.. 5 million.. The estimate of waste per capita generation per day is 0.. 5kg.. This makes the total collection to be 1.. 5 million x 0.. 5kg = 750,000kg per day or 750 tonnes generated per day.. Domestic waste generation is higher among high income earners.. On average the collection is 45-50% of the total waste and so on a daily basis collection amounts to 375 tonnes or 37,500kg of waste collected a day  ...   urban waste management activities, including collection, transportation, treatment, processing, separate collection, recycling, composting, and disposal of waste.. Neighborhood associations, communities, and small, informal enterprises are increasingly involving themselves in the management of household and business wastes; with the explicit aim of creating livelihoods and maintaining a clean and healthy living environment.. Sewerage disposal.. Currently Kampala has only one sewage treatment plant in Bugolobi, an area of Kampala.. This has a limited sewer network, but is operating below capacity.. Each day 300 out of the 1000 tones of sewage generated in Kampala, is deposed off directly into the environment.. According to the National Water and Sewerage Cooperation, only 600 tones of the sewage goes through proper sewer lines and is treated, while the remaining 100 is retained in latrines and septic tanks.. National Water is planning to expand its sewerage network with two more treatment plants at Kinawataka in Mbuya and Lubigi in Nabweru.. Presently, only 8 percent of Kampala's residents are connected to proper sewer lines..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: About Us.. Eligibility.. Network membership is open to national and international organizations, institutions, community based organizations, corporate organisations as well as individuals who subscribe to the vision, mission core values of the Network; support participate in the programmes of the Network.. Membership requirements include: completion submission of a membership application form, payment of membership annual subscription fees and approval by the Membership Subcommittee of the Network Board.. The benefits of membership:.. Partnership and collaboration in activity.. implementation.. Participation in research activities commissioned by.. the Network..

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  • Title: Shelter and Settlements Alternatives
    Descriptive info: Membership.. Member Profiles.. Member Profiles.. NON GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS (NGO S).. Name.. Physical Address.. E-mail.. Website.. Community Shelters Uganda.. P.. O.. Box 33081, Kampala, Plot 65, Semawata Road, Ntinda, Tel: 0414 288 617.. info@communitysheltersuganda.. org.. www.. communitysheltersuganda.. Act Together Uganda.. Block 244, Plot 1814 Tank Hill Rd.. Kabalagala.. Box 36557 Kampala, Uganda.. actogether.. ug@gmail.. com.. actogetherug.. Wellspring.. Bweyogerere, Kiira Town council P.. O Box 7543 Kampala Uganda +256 414 505 771.. admin@wellspring.. or.. ug.. Rural Housing Foundation.. Block 244, Bukasa Road; Namuwongo-Kanyogoga Zone; P.. O Box 26955, Kampala Tel: 0772592211.. frhseug@yahoo.. wisconsinruralhousing.. Uganda Environmental Education Foundation.. PO Box 5658 Kampala Tel: 256 414 290740.. ugandaenvironmental@yahoo.. ueef.. Uganda Women Land Access Trust.. 38 Lumumba Avenue Nakasero Phone 041-4234877.. Community Integrated Initiatives (CIDI).. 2809 Tank hill road Muyenga Kampala P.. Box 692 Kampala Uganda Tel: +256-414-510358.. cidi@cidi.. cidi.. National Community for Women Living with HIV/AIDS Uganda (NACWOLA-Uganda).. Box 4485, Kampala Lower Muyenga B, Bukasa Road, Muyenga Tel: 256-41-510528.. nacwola@infocom.. co.. nacwola.. Uganda Land Alliance.. Plot 1521, Block 2, Mawanda Road; P.. O Box 26990, Kampala 256-414-540048.. ula@ulaug.. ulaug.. National Association of Women Organizations In Uganda (NAWOU).. Plot 1, Perryman Gardens - Bakuli; Off Hoima Road; P.. O Box 1663, Kampala 256-414-258463.. nawou@nawouganda.. org.. nawouganda.. CO-OPERATIVES.. Name.. Uganda Cooperative Alliance..  ...   Management Project (KIEMP).. Kampala City Council, City Hall, Room No B20, P.. Box 7010 Kampala, Uganda Tel: 256-41-234497.. kiemp@kiemp.. go.. kiemp.. COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS (CBO s).. Village Voluntary Venture.. Main Office P.. Box 332 Nebbi Liaison Office P.. Box 26833 Kampala Tel +256 782 430 540 Tel +256 785 819 280.. vilvolven@yahoo.. Mariam Foundation.. Ssekabaka Kintu Road Lubaga Division P.. O Box 30456 Kampala Tel: 0759332211.. mariam_found@yahoo.. Slum Dwellers Association.. Kiti Zone Mengo Kisenyi III Mutebi Road Tel: 0773161573.. Balinda-edward@yahoo.. Mukono Multipurpose Youth Organization.. Mukono-Kayunga road Naggalama Town Nkima House PO Box 7838 Kampala.. mumyoug@yahoo.. Family Support Initiative.. O Box 247 Kamuli Uganda.. fasiuganda@gmail.. PROFESSIONALS.. Area of Expertise.. Vincent Biribonwa Byendamira.. Physical Planner.. Century house Parliament Avenue P.. O Box 7096 Kampala Tel: 0772447262.. vbateenyi@mlhud.. Mr.. Walaga William.. Housing Expert.. Ministry of Lands, Housing Urban Development P.. O Box 7096, Kampala Tel: 0772509204.. wwalaga@yahoo.. uk.. mlhud.. Eddie Gayiya Nsamba.. Housing and Land Expert.. 2nd Floor, Jumbo Plaza; Plot 2 Parliament Avenue; P.. O Box 2169, Kampala.. egnsamba@yahoo.. Muhwezi Derek A.. B.. Physical planner/Lecturer.. Makerere University Tel: 0772424254.. dmuhwezi@arts.. mak.. ac.. ug.. Joel Cox.. Lawyer.. Joel Cox Advocates Greenland towers.. jucox200@yahoo.. Deborah Kaijuka.. Housing expert.. SSA-UHSNET Bukoto Old Kiira Road P.. O Box 4371 Kampala Tel: 0712286192.. winrwa@yahoo..

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  • Archived pages: 42