www.archive-org-2014.com » ORG » S » STPAULSIRVINE

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".

    Archived pages: 101 . Archive date: 2014-09.

  • Title: Saint Pauls Greek Orthodox Church - Irvine, CA
    Descriptive info: .. Wednesday, September 3rd.. Serving meals at St.. Anselm's Church in Anaheim 11am - 2pm.. Monday, September 8th.. The Nativity of the Holy Theotokos.. Morning Prayer 9am.. Divine Liturgy 10am.. Sunday, September 14th.. Exaltation of the Holy Cross.. Blessing of New Acolytes 9:45am.. Visits to Shut-ins 12:30pm.. Monday, September 15th.. Women's Study Fellowship begins 6:30pm.. Thursday, September 18th.. Women's Bible Study begins 10am.. Friday, September 19th.. St.. Paul's Golf Classic 11:30am.. Sunday, September 21st.. Sunday After the Holy Cross.. Church School Begins.. Divine Liturgy 10am.. FOCUS Feeding the homeless 4:30pm - 8pm.. Monday, September 22nd.. Serving meals at Isaiah House.. in Santa Ana 4:30pm.. Wednesday, September 24th.. Orthodox Christianity 101 begins 7pm.. Tuesday, September 30th.. Introduction to Orthodox Theology begins 7pm.. Welcome to St.. Pauls Greek Orthodox Church.. Although St.. Pauls as a community celebrated its first services in Irvine in 1978, it is part of the worldwide Orthodox Christian Church that began on the day of Pentecost in Jerusalem as described in the Acts of the Apostles, and today spans the globe from Palestine to Japan, Greece to Tanzania, Russia to Argentina, England to Korea, Romania  ...   that question is to ask a couple of questions.. Did you know that every book of the New Testament was originally written in Greek? That the Apostle Paul preached in Athens not far from the Parthenon and wrote five letters to the Churches he established in Corinth, Philippi and Thessalonika that are today books of the Bible? Who are we? The answer is actually very simple: we are that Church written about on the pages of the New Testament some 2,000 years later!.. read more.. Newcomers and visitors are always welcome at St.. Pauls! While it is our hope that this website will help you learn more about our parish and the Orthodox Christian faith we confess, we hope - above all else - that you will personally come visit us.. Please feel free to visit St.. Pauls and pray with us.. on any given Sunday.. You will discover an ancient yet dynamic faith, a welcoming Church family, and perhaps even a spiritual home where you can plant roots to deepen your relationship with Christ in the Holy Spirit.. With love in the crucified and risen Lord,..

    Original link path: /
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: Paul s!.. We invite you to come and worship with us! Our community continually strives to provide a holy place of worship that is inviting to all.. We sincerely hope that your worship experience with us will bring you closer to our Lord, God, and Savior, Jesus Christ.. Please take the time to sign our guest book at the entrance to the Church.. And please accept our invitation to join us after Divine Liturgy next door in the Parish Center for Coffee Hour.. If you are not familiar with Orthodox worship, please ask one of our Welcome Committee members or one of the Ushers for assistance.. Are you a Christian? If you are seeking spiritual direction or would like to know how to become a Christian, please contact our pastor, Fr.. Steve at.. father@stpaulsirvine.. org.. Orthodox Christians, like the earliest Christian communities that met in the catacombs of ancient Rome and  ...   is the dome and its depiction of Christ, as well as other figures from both the Old and New Testaments.. Vimeo video link: Dome.. Many people are unfamiliar with the Orthodox Christian faith and often ask us what we believe.. Tracing our roots to the earliest Christian communities in the New Testament - Corinth, Thessaloniki, Athens and other ancient centers of the Christian faith - our beliefs are essentially the same.. To learn more about what we believe, please view the videos below.. What we believe about our humanity made in God's image:.. Being Human.. What we believe about the renewal of our humanity in baptism:.. Baptism.. What we believe about the Bible:.. Bible.. What we believe about the marriage:.. Marriage.. If you would like to learn more about St.. Paul's and our faith in Christ, please visit some of the other pages on our parish website at.. http://www.. stpaulsirvine.. org/orthodoxy.. html..

    Original link path: /newcomers.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: WORSHIP AT ST.. PAULS.. Every Sunday.. Service of.. Orthros.. (Morning Prayer) - 9:00 a.. m.. Divine Liturgy - 10:00 a.. (Family Worship).. Childrens Church School.. - after Holy Communion, follows traditional school year.. (September - June).. Special Services.. See Parish Calendar of Events and Worship Services.. Holy Week Services for 2014.. ARTICLES RELATED TO WORSHIP.. Worship.. by Father Thomas Fitzgerald.. The House of God.. The Holy Eucharist.. Who May Receive Holy Communion In the Orthodox Church?.. by Father Steven Tsichlis.. The Sacraments.. Eucharistic Discipline in the Orthodox Church.. by Father Thomas Hopko.. Preparation for Holy Communion.. On the Question of Liturgical Practices: A Letter to My Bishop.. by Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann.. Special Services and Blessings.. The Sacramental Life of the Orthodox Church.. by Father Alciviadis C.. Calivas.. Orthodox Worship.. Worship, Beauty and the Desire for God.. by Frederica Mathewes- Green.. Excerpted from At the Corner of East and Now.. A Hunger For God.. by Paraskevè (Eve) Tibbs.. Orthodox Art and Architecture.. by John Yiannias.. The Liturgical Path of Orthodoxy in America.. by Paul Meyendorff, Ph.. D.. The Archdiocesan Presbyters Council Liturgical Issues Committee Report.. a report presented by Father Steven Tsichlis.. Resources for Great Lent in the Orthodox Church.. WHO MAY RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION IN THE ORTHODOX CHURCH?.. Orthodox Christians fully participate in the celebration of the Liturgy when they receive the body and blood of the Lord Jesus in the sacrament of holy communion, as the Lord commands (John 6:53).. To receive communion in the Orthodox Church, one must be a practicing Orthodox Christian.. This means that you must be baptized and/or chrismated in the Orthodox Church and that your beliefs and lifestyle are in accordance with the teachings of the Church.. In order to be properly prepared for this encounter with Christ, those seeking to receive communion should not be conscious of grave sin in their lives, having opened their hearts with prayer, fasted appropriately and lived with charity and love towards their neighbors.. Because, as the apostle Paul teaches, it is possible to receive the body and blood of the Lord in an unworthy manner and actually be sinning against the body and blood of the Lord (1 Corinthians 11:27-30), those who are aware of grave sin in their lives should participate in the sacrament of confession - confess their sins and be reconciled to Christ and His Church - before approaching the chalice to receive communion.. (Read 1 John 1:8-10; James 5:16; and John 20:19-23.. ) Frequent reception of the body and blood of Christ - at every Liturgy, if possible - is encouraged for all Orthodox Christians.. This is in keeping with the ancient practice of the Church and the teaching of the saints.. Basil the Great, for example, writing to the Roman patrician Caesarius in 372AD, says that  ...   receive communion, we invite those visiting our parish to pray with us for peace and unity within the human family and hear the Good News of Jesus Christ.. THE SCRIPTURAL TEACHING ON THE MEANING OF HOLY COMMUNION.. The Lord Jesus said: I am the bread of life.. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.. I am the living bread which came down from heaven.. If anyone eats of this bread, they will live forever; and the bread which I shall give for the life of the world is my flesh.. Amen, amen, I say to you: unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you.. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life and I will raise them up on the last day.. For my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink.. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me and I in them.. Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me.. - John 6:35,51,53-57.. The apostle Paul said: The cup of blessing which we bless: is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread which we break: is it not a participation in the body of Christ? Because there is one loaf, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the same loaf.. For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you: that the Lord Jesus, on the night when he was betrayed, took a loaf of bread and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, This is my body which is broken for you.. Do this in remembrance of me.. In the same way, after supper, he also took the cup, saying, This cup is the New Testament in my blood.. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.. For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lords death until he comes.. Whoever, therefore, eats the bread of drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be answerable for the body and blood of the Lord.. Examine yourselves and only then eat of the bread and drink of the cup.. For all who eat and drink in an unworthy manner, without discerning the Lords body, eat and drink judgment against themselves.. For this reason, many of you are weak and ill and some have died.. - 1 Corinthians 10:16-17; 11:23-30.. Also, read the accounts of the Last Supper given at Matthew 26:26-29; Mark 14:22-25 and Luke 22:14-23.. Top..

    Original link path: /worship.html
    Open archive
  •  

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: CALENDAR OF EVENTS..

    Original link path: /events.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: CHURCH MAP DIRECTIONS.. View Larger Map..

    Original link path: /findus.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ORTHODOX CHURCH by Fr.. Steven Tsichlis.. Many people believe that in order to be Christian, you must be a member of a Roman Catholic, Protestant or more recently, a non-denominational church.. As Orthodox Christians, we are catholic, but not Roman Catholic.. Catholic is a Greek word that means wholeness, fullness, integrity and, secondarily, universal and open to all.. We confess the Christian faith in its fullness and our Church is open to everyone who confesses that faith and wants to live it.. Evangelical comes from the Greek word that means Gospel or Good News.. We are a Gospel-centered and Gospel-sharing community.. But we are not Protestants.. The root of the word Protestant is protest.. We did not participate in the 16th century Reformation that protested, among other things, the sale of indulgences by the Roman Catholic Church of that time.. Nor are we non-denominational, a popular term in contemporary American Christianity.. Rather, we are pre-denominational, as our history goes back to the earliest Church, before any of the many Protestant denominations existed.. And orthodox is a Greek word that means both the true way to worship and straight thinking.. Attach it to the word Christian as we do and it describes a person trying to live according to the Gospel.. Because Orthodox Christianity is simply New Testament Christianity 2,000 years later it is quite different in a number of ways from Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.. The following questions and answers drawn from a conversation between neighbors indicate both some important points of contrast as well as similarity:.. Are you Jewish?.. No.. We're most definitely Christians!.. Oh, then, you're Orthodox Presbyterians?.. We're neither Protestant nor Roman Catholic.. Oh, you mean like Eastern Orthodox ?.. Yes, except that we as Americans are very much in and of the West.. Ironically it is from the West that the Eastern Orthodox Church came to these shores some two hundred years ago through Alaska and California.. Since that time Orthodox Christianity has been flourishing in the U.. S.. Is that like Greek Orthodox and Russian Orthodox ?.. Yes, but the Orthodox Church is one Church.. To be Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, Romanian Orthodox or Serbian Orthodox is like being Irish Catholic, Italian Catholic, or Polish Catholic - it's the same Church, the same faith, but rooted in a different country and culture.. Currently, however, Church organization in North America is divided among several different jurisdictions, or governing bodies of varying national origin within the one Church.. The doctrine and worship of each jurisdiction and parish is the same, though in some, languages other than English continue to be used in the services.. I thought there are just two kinds of Christians, Protestant and Catholic.. How can you claim you are neither?.. From the Orthodox point of view, Roman Catholicism is a medieval modification of the original Orthodox faith of the Church in Western Europe, and Protestantism is a later attempt to return to the original Faith.. There is a certain sense in which, to our way of thinking, the Reformation did not go far enough.. We respectfully differ with Roman Catholicism on questions of papal authority, the nature of primacy within the Church, and a number of other consequent issues.. Historically, the Orthodox Church is both pre-Protestant and pre-Roman Catholic in the sense that many modern Roman Catholic teachings (such as the dogmas of papal infallibility and the immaculate conception of the Virgin Mary) were developed much later in Christian history.. The word catholic is a Greek word meaning having to do with wholeness, fullness of faith.. We do consider ourselves Catholic in that sense of the word, that is, as proclaiming and practicing the fullness of the Christian faith.. In fact, the full title of our Church is The Orthodox Catholic Church.. We find that Protestants readily relate to Orthodoxy's emphasis on personal faith and the Scriptures.. Roman Catholics easily identify with Orthodoxy's rich liturgical worship and sacramental life.. Roman Catholic visitors often comment, in lots of ways your Liturgy reminds me of our old High Mass.. Many of the polarities that exist between Protestants and Roman Catholics (i.. e.. , Word versus Sacrament or Bible versus Tradition or Faith versus Works ) have never arisen in the Orthodox Church.. We believe that Orthodox theology offers Roman Catholics and Protestants a way in which apparently opposite differences can be reconciled.. Why do you call yourselves Orthodox ?.. The word orthodox was coined by the ancient Christian Fathers of the Church, the name traditionally given to the Christian writers in the first centuries of Christian history.. Orthodox is a combination of two Greek words, orthos and doxa.. Orthos means straight or correct.. (It is also found in the word orthopedics, which in the original Greek means the correct education of children.. ) Doxa means at one and the same time glory, worship and doctrine.. So the word orthodox signifies both proper worship and correct doctrine.. The Orthodox Church today is identical to the undivided Church of ancient times.. It is the Church found on the pages of the New Testament.. The 16th century Protestant Reformer Martin Luther once remarked that he believed the pure Faith of primitive Christianity is to be found in the Orthodox Church.. Then you must be a very conservative Church.. In current American usage, the words conservative and liberal are highly politicized categories and indicate a variety of often-conflicting viewpoints.. Usually we don't really fit either category very well.. For example, on seven major occasions during the first millennium of Christianity the leaders of the worldwide Church, from Britain to Ethiopia, from Spain and Italy to Turkey and Arabia, met to settle crucial issues of Faith in confronting false doctrines about our Lord Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit.. The Orthodox Church is highly conservative in the sense that we adhere to the teachings of those seven Ecumenical Councils to this day.. But that very conservatism in Christology and Trinitarian theology often makes us liberal in certain questions of civil liberties, social justice and peace.. We are also very conservative, or rather traditional, in the structures of our liturgical worship.. Which do you believe in: the Bible or Tradition?.. A good short answer to this question is Yes! The question implies precisely the kind of polarity (i.. , Bible versus Tradition ) which is not found in the Orthodox Christian worldview.. Tradition or in Greek paradosis, is found very often in the New Testament both as a verb and a noun.. (See 1 Corinthians 11:23, where literally translating the original Greek, Paul says for I received of the Lord that which I also have traditioned to you.. See also 1 Corinthians 11:2, and 2 Thessalonians 2:15 and 3:6.. ).. Tradition means that which is handed over.. The New Testament carefully distinguishes between traditions of men and the Tradition, which is the Faith handed over to us by Christ in the Holy Spirit.. That same Faith was believed and practiced several decades before the New Testament Scriptures were set  ...   means we are glad to receive new members in the Orthodox Church.. The Orthodox concept of Communion is totally holistic, and radically different from that of most other Christian groups.. We do not separate the idea of Holy Communion from Being in Communion, Full Communion, Inter-Communion and complete Communion in the Faith.. In the Orthodox Church therefore, to receive Holy Communion, or any other Sacrament (Mystery), is taken to be a declaration of total commitment to the Orthodox Faith.. While we warmly welcome visitors to our services, it is understood that only those communicant members of the Orthodox Church who are prepared by prayer, almsgiving, fasting and confession will approach the Holy Mysteries.. Why do you have all those pictures in your church?.. Icons are not pictures in the sense of naturalistic representations.. They are rather stylized and symbolic expressions of divinized humanity.. (See 2 Peter 1:4; 1 John 3:2.. ) Icons for the Orthodox are sacramental signs of God's great Cloud of Witnesses (Hebrews 12:1).. We do not worship icons.. Rather, we experience icons as windows into Heaven.. Like the Bible, icons are earthly points of contact with transcendent Reality.. In the original Greek of the New Testament Christ is called - several times - the icon (image) of God the Father.. (See 2 Corinthians 4:4; Colossians 1:15; Hebrews 1:3.. ) We human beings were originally created to be icons of God (Genesis 1:27).. Isn't all your old-fashioned doctrine and worship irrelevant to modern American life?.. We believe that God really does exist.. He is not the figment of pious imagination, a devout fiction or wishful thinking.. God and His will is our top priority in life! We believe that the Word of God quite literally became Incarnate in Jesus of Nazareth.. We believe the Lord Jesus literally rose from the dead in a real though transfigured and glorified physical body.. We believe that life apart from God is hollow and meaningless.. We notice that people today talk often of the meaning of life, having meaningful relationships, the common good, the good of humanity, hope for the future of mankind and so on.. Also, various cults continue to attract many followers in all parts of our country.. This indicates to us that people today are hungry for the answers we believe God has revealed through His Word, Who is Jesus Christ.. We believe ultimate human values are revealed to us by God, and serve as constant guides in the use of our steadily expanding scientific knowledge.. We seek to evaluate technological advances in the light of those basic values.. It is our experience that our venerable Liturgy and the ancient Christian doctrines about God and the meaning of human life are just as relevant today as yesterday.. These define our basic values.. We know the whole ancient Christian Faith as that which makes more sense than anything else in this world of constant change, confusion and conflict.. God is the Source of all Meaning; we believe that mankind's noblest ideals such as truth, beauty, freedom and love, are not merely ideals, but real characteristics of a real Lord.. In and through Christ Jesus, God reveals Himself in human terms and in human terminology as One who is at the same time a Trinity of Persons.. The word person as used in classical Christian theology is not the singular form of people ; God is not Three people.. Person here means something similar to I, or Subject, as in the subject of a sentence.. The One God is revealed as having three personal Centers of Being.. God is therefore neither alone nor lonely, for the One Lord is also perfect Communion of Persons.. God as Trinity is the model and source of human inter-personal communion and fellowship.. We were created to be capable of communion (mystical union) with God.. Human matrimony is a favorite biblical image for this communion-relationship.. Our capacity for divine communion was soon damaged by human error, stubbornness, and evil (i.. , sin).. Because of God's infinite love, our potential for communion with God has been restored, renewed, and transfigured by Christ Jesus in the Holy Spirit.. Christ communicates His very life to us through His Scriptures and Sacraments.. In Christ and the Holy Spirit we can and do experience varying degrees of a mystical union with God now in this life, and on a regular basis.. We believe that the purpose of human life is for us to become partakers of the divine nature (2 Peter 1:4) through the grace of the Holy Spirit, in prayer, the sacraments, in study of the Scriptures, fasting, self-discipline, and active love for others.. All other human projects and purposes, however noble and important, remain secondary to that, which gives ultimate meaning to human existence.. This brief outline of the Orthodox Faith necessarily only touches upon a number of more involved issues.. If you would like to find out more, we welcome your inquiries.. Some Facts about Orthodoxy.. There are some 250 million Orthodox Christians in the world.. Most Christians in Greece, Romania, Bulgaria and Serbia, Russia and the Ukraine are Orthodox.. Three million Americans are Orthodox Christians.. The heaviest concentrations of Orthodox in America are in Alaska, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio.. Organized Orthodox Church life first came to America in 1794 with missionaries from old Russia who came to Alaska.. Centuries of vigorous Orthodox missionary activity across 12 times zones in northern Europe and Asia was halted by the Communists after the Soviet Revolution in 1917.. Today Orthodox missions are active in Central and East Africa, Japan, Korea and many other parts of the world.. A brief statement of faith.. I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible;.. And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all ages.. Light of Light, true God of true God, begotten, not created, of one essence with the Father through whom all things were made.. For us and for our salvation, He came down from heaven and was incarnate of the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary and became man.. He was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate and He suffered and was buried.. On the third day He rose according to the Scriptures.. He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead.. His Kingdom will have no end.. And In the Holy Sprit, the Lord, the Giver of Life, who proceeds from the Father,.. who together with the Father and Son is worshipped and glorified, who spoke through the prophets.. In one, holy, catholic and apostolic church.. I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.. I expect the resurrection of the dead and the life of the age to come.. Amen!.. To learn more, please go to the.. Orthodoxy page.. of our parish website for a collection of articles, lectures and films..

    Original link path: /FAQs.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: RECOMMENDED LINKS.. ORGANIZATIONS.. Orthodox Peace Fellowship.. The Orthodox Fellowship of the Transfiguration.. Orthodox Christian Prison Ministry.. The Order of St.. Andrew (Archons of the Ecumenical Patriarchate).. National College Ministry: Orthodox Christian Fellowship.. The Orthodox Christian Center for the Advancement of Biblical Studies.. The Orthodox Christian Association of Medicine, Psychology and Religion.. WOMEN: the St.. Nina Quarterly.. The Orthodox Christian Network.. - OCN's Orthodox Radio Talk Show.. Ancient Faith Radio.. Orthodox Family Life.. Syndesmos: World Fellowship of Orthodox Youth.. ORTHODOX THEOLOGIANS AND WRITERS.. Father Alexander Schmemann Homepage.. Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh.. Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh Archive.. Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev.. Jim Forest.. Frederica Mathewes-Green.. ORTHODOX JURISDICTIONS IN AMERICA.. The Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops.. The Standing Conference of Canonical Orthodox Bishop in Americas.. The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America.. The Antiochian Archdiocese.. The Orthodox Church in America.. WORLDWIDE ORTHODOXY.. The Ecumenical Patriarchate.. The Patriarchate of Alexandria all Africa.. The Patriarchate of Moscow.. The Patriarchate of Serbia.. The Patriarchate of Georgia.. The Patriarchate of Romania.. The Church of Albania.. The Church of Finland.. The Church of Greece.. The Patriarchate of Bulgaria.. The Church of Japan.. The Church of Tanzania.. The Metropolis of Korea.. ORTHODOX CAMPS RETREAT CENTERS.. Saint Nicholas Ranch Retreat Center.. Antiochian Village Camp Conference Center.. Ionian  ...   Sergius Lavra.. The Decani Monastery.. Valamo Monastery.. The Monastery of Saint John the Theologian on Patmos.. Catherine's Monastery.. Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery.. John the Forerunner Monastery.. The Monks of New Skete.. The Entrance of the Theotokos Monastery.. ORTHODOX CHARITIES.. Orthodox Diakonia.. The Philoptochos Society.. Trinity Children's Foundation.. Project Mexico/St.. Innocent's Orphanage.. Hogar Rafael Ayau (Orphanage).. The Philanthropic Society (India).. Nicholas Uganda Children's Fund.. The Orthodox Christian Mission Center.. IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities).. FOCUS North America.. DIALOGUE WITH OTHER CHRISTIANS.. The Fellowship of St.. Alban and St.. Sergius (Sobornost).. The Huffington Ecumenical Institute at Loyola Marymount.. The Society of St.. John Chrysostom Western Region.. John Chrysostom USA.. Hospitality of Abraham (Holy Trinity).. An icon by St.. Andrei Rublev.. Cappella Romana at St.. Paul's.. January, 1999.. Read a Review of Cappella Romana's December 2006 concert.. Archbishop Demetrios of America.. preaching at St.. Paul's.. February 17, 2002.. Vladimir's Orthodox.. Theological Seminary Chorale.. January 16, 2006.. see additional photos from their visit.. Metropolitan Kallistos Ware preaching at St.. Paul's March 2, 2008.. Jim Forest at St.. October 20, 2008.. Father Thomas Hopko teaching at St.. May 9, 2009.. Professor Scott Cairns.. leading a Pure Monday mini-retreat.. February 27, 2012.. The Girls Orphanage near Kolkata, India.. Supported by St.. Paul's Philoptochos..

    Original link path: /links.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: ST.. PAUL, THE APOSTLE TO THE GENTILES.. The celebration of his memory in the life of the Church: October 29th and June 29th.. Paul s significance in the history of Christianity can hardly be underestimated: an indefatigable missionary, the first interpreter of the Good News of Jesus Christ to the Gentile world, he is also the author of more New Testament books than any other writer.. BACKGROUND.. When we first meet him in the Book of Acts (7:58-8:1) it is as Saul; and later, Acts 13:9 describes him as Saul, who is also called Paul.. As a Jew he bore the name of Israel s first king (1 Samuel 9:2, 17); but as a free citizen of the Empire, he also bore a Roman name.. Many Jews of this period in history had two names, one Semitic and the other Greek or Roman.. A child of the tribe of Benjamin (Romans 11:1; Philippians 3:5; 2 Corinthians 11:22), Paul proudly identified himself as an Israelite and a Hebrew born of Hebrews, as to the law a Pharisee (Philippians 3:5) extremely zealous for the traditions of my fathers who excelled his peers in Judaism (Galatians 1:14).. But he was also proud to be a Jew from Tarsus in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city (Acts 21:39).. Tarsus was a Hellenized city, famous for its university, gymnasium, theatre, art school and gymnasium.. It became the capital of the province of Cilicia during Pompey s reorganization of Roman Asia Minor in 66 BC.. Later on, Mark Antony famous as Cleopatra s lover granted freedom and Roman citizenship to the people of Tarsus.. In an age when most of the people living within the boundaries of the Pax Romana were slaves, Paul was born a free citizen of the Empire.. Paul was educated strictly according to the law of our fathers at the rabbinical school conducted in Jerusalem by the great rabbi Gamaliel (Acts 22:3).. Gamaliel was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, a teacher of the law respected by all the people (Acts 5:34).. Although Gamaliel is depicted in the New Testament as lenient towards Christians (Acts 5:33-39), his disciple Saul was active in the earliest persecutions of Christianity and attended the stoning of St.. Stephen the deacon and first Christian martyr (Acts 7:58).. Paul persecuted this Way to the death, binding and delivering to prison both men and women (Acts 22:4).. CONVERSION.. Intent on exterminating the new faith, Paul sought to travel to Damascus to undertake the persecution of Christians there.. It was during his trip from Jerusalem to Damascus in Syria that his life would take a crucial turn when he encountered the risen Jesus in a searing vision of light that left him temporarily blind.. This experience was revolutionary, engendering a complete transformation and redirection of his life.. As a result of this revelation (Galatians 1:12), Saul, the bloodthirsty persecutor of Christianity converted to the faith he once hated, was baptized by Ananias and received into the Church of Damascus, the very community he had set out to suppress (Acts 9:10-31).. From this moment on, he became a slave of Jesus Christ (Romans 1:1) and in that slavery discovered the glorious freedom of the children of God (Romans 8:21).. Luke recounts this Damascus experience three times in the Book of Acts: once in the narrative, Acts 9:3-19; and twice, in speeches, before a crowd in Jerusalem (22:6-16) and before Festus and King Agrippa (26:12-18).. Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord,.. went to the high priest and asked him for letters to the synagogues of.. Damascus, so that if he found any that belonged to the Way,.. men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem.. While I was on my way and approaching Damascus, about noon, I saw.. a great light from heaven, brighter than the sun, that suddenly shone.. around me and my companions.. When we had all fallen to the ground,.. I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language,.. Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?.. I answered, asking, Who are you, Lord?.. The Lord answered, I am Jesus whom you are persecuting.. But get up and stand on your feet!.. I have appeared to you for this purpose:.. to appoint you to serve and testify to the things you have seen.. I will rescue you from your people and the Gentiles to whom I am sending you,.. to open their eyes so that they may turn from darkness to light.. and from the power of Satan to God, so that they may receive forgiveness of their sins.. and a place among those who are being made holy by faith in Me.. This vision of the glory of God - what later theologians and saints will call the uncreated light - is the call by which Paul becomes the Apostle to the Gentiles, the greatest missionary in the history of Christianity.. It is through his missionary efforts that Christianity, originally a sect of Judaism, becomes a world religion.. PREACHING, MISSIONARY JOURNEYS AND THE.. APOSTOLIC COUNCIL IN JERUSALEM.. After his encounter with the risen Lord on the road to Damascus and baptism at the hands of Ananias, Paul tells us in his letter to the Galatians that he went away at once into Arabia, spending time in the desert wastes before returning to Damascus, where he remained for three years (1:17-18).. By the time of his return to Damascus, the essentials of his teaching were crystal clear: God s promise to Abraham has been fulfilled in the resurrection  ...   In modern Bibles, they are placed in order of their length, with the longest letter, that to the Romans, being first and then followed by letters to individuals (Timothy, Titus and Philemon) last.. Paul s letters are exactly that: letters, occasional writings meant to deal with specific issues in the churches to which he addressed them.. They are not systematic theological treatises in the modern sense.. And yet, they have provided rich and deep theological insights that have never been surpassed in the Church s history.. Image of copy of St.. Pauls letter to the Romans c.. AD 180-200.. Greek text on papyrus.. Click to see larger image.. To read more about each of the letters of St.. Paul click here.. To read excerpts from St.. Paul s letters about living the Christian life, click here.. IMPRISONMENT AND FINAL YEARS.. It is during his last visit to Jerusalem to visit James (Acts 21:18) that Paul is arrested near the Temple after a small riot and taken by a Roman tribune before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish council.. Paul defends himself before the Sanhedrin by playing on the dissension between the Pharisees and Sadducees and their conflict over the resurrection.. After a plot to assassinate Paul is discovered, Paul s case is transferred to Antonius Felix, the procurator of Judea, who keeps him in prison for two years, expecting a bribe.. When Felix s successor, Festus, arrives on the scene, Paul appeals his case to Caesar, requesting a trial in Rome by virtue of his Roman citizenship.. You have appealed to the emperor; to the emperor you will go, Festus replied (Acts 25:12).. Paul s journey to Rome was to be an eventful one that included shipwreck.. The Book of Acts closes with Paul under house arrest in Rome still carrying out his ministry of teaching and preaching faithful to his Master to the end.. During his thirty-year ministry as an apostle what had Paul suffered for the sake of the Gospel? Already in 2 Corinthians, Paul describes some of what he endured to preach the Good News of Jesus risen from the dead: Five times I have received from the Jews the forty lashes minus one.. Three times I was beaten with rods.. Once I received a stoning.. Three times I was shipwrecked.. For a night and a day I was adrift at sea.. On frequent journeys, I was in danger from rivers, from bandits, from my own people, from Gentiles, in danger in the city, in danger in the wilderness, in danger at sea, in danger from false brethren; in toil and hardship, through many a sleepless night, hungry and thirsty, often without food, cold and naked.. And, besides other things, I am under daily pressure because of my anxiety for all the churches (11:24-29).. Eusebius, the 4th century bishop of Caesarea who is often called the first Church historian, records that the apostle Paul was executed in Rome during the persecution of the emperor and madman, Nero.. Nero s persecution of Christians lasted for four years, from 64 to 68AD.. It was also during this persecution that the apostle Peter was executed.. As a Roman citizen entitled to a quick death, Paul was beheaded.. Gregory the Great, the 6th century pope, wrote that Paul s execution took place on the left bank of the Tiber River on the Via Ostiensis, the road to the port of Ostia, and is buried under the main altar of the basilica of St.. Paul Outside the Walls.. The Hymn of St.. Paul.. listen to it.. Facing danger at sea and fearful persecution,.. you became a chosen vessel of the Savior.. By your sermons you enlightened the nations.. and to the Athenians you revealed the unknown God.. Teacher of the nations, St.. Paul the Apostle, protector of us all,.. keep us who honor you safe from every trial and danger.. The Scriptural Roots of the Hymn of St.. Click here to view the text of:.. Paul the Apostle to the Gentiles: Who are Todays Gentiles? by Valerie Karras.. Great Vespers for the Feast of St.. Paul the Apostle.. In the Footsteps of St.. A Pilgrimage.. May 29 - June 13, 2005.. A monument to St.. Paul in.. modern Berea, Greece.. Notes on the Pilgrimage.. by Fr.. Steve Tsichlis.. Journal of the Pilgrimage.. , by Sheryl Martello.. One of the oldest known icons of St.. Paul, dating from the early 4th century, discovered by archaeologists in June, 2009 in the Roman Catacomb of St.. Thekla on the Via Ostiensus, not far from the Church of St.. Paul s Outside-the-Walls, where the relics of St.. Paul are buried beneath the main altar.. See Photos from Ecumenical Service Commemorating the beginning of.. Year of St.. Paul.. with Metropolitan Gerasimos of San Francisco and Bishop Tod Brown of Orange.. Saint Paul and the Unity of the Church.. An Address by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew to the Heads of the Orthodox Churches.. A Sermon for the Feast of Saint Paul.. by Dr.. Valerie Karras.. The Church is the Body of Christ.. and the Womb of Salvation.. October 26, 2008.. Faith Alone and Faith and Works in the Scriptures:.. An Orthodox Christian Approach.. Faith and Culture in Saint Paul.. Theodore Stylianopoulos.. Listen to An interview with Fr.. Ted Stylianopoulos.. on Ancient Faith Radio: How Orthodox Christians understand St.. Part I.. Part II.. Listen to five lectures on St.. the Apostle: His Life, Witness and Theology by Father Theodore Stylianopoulos given at St.. Pauls January 11th - 15th, 2009.. See Photos from Ecumenical Service Commemorating the close of the.. "Year of St.. Paul"..

    Original link path: /stpaul.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: ORTHODOXY.. Additionally, see our.. Iconography Page.. for articles on iconography and our.. Worship Page.. for articles related to worship, our.. Ethics and Moral Issues Page.. and.. Wisdom of the Saints.. articles written by selected Saints of the Church.. INTRODUCTIONS TO ORTHODOXY:.. FAQ's - Frequently Asked Questions About the Orthodox Church.. First Visit to An Orthodox Church - Twelve Things I Wish I'd Known.. by Frederica Mathewes Green.. The Kissing Part.. Meeting the Orthodox: Questions and Answers.. Understanding Orthodox Christianity.. by Jim Forest.. The Attractions of Orthodoxy.. Why are Priests called 'Father' in your Church?.. A Dictionary of Orthodox Terminology - Part I.. by Fotios K.. Litsas, Ph.. A Dictionary of Orthodox Terminology - Part II.. Orthodox Christians in North America 1794-1994.. by Mark Stokoe in collaboration with Leonid Kishkovsky.. FATHER ALEXANDER SCHMEMANN:.. The Canonical Problem.. by Father Alexander Schmemann.. The Liturgical Problem.. The Spiritual Problem.. FATHER THOMAS FITZGERALD:.. The History of the Church.. The Church.. Spirituality.. FATHER THOMAS HOPKO:.. Finding One's Calling in Life.. by Father Thomas Hopko - Article from OED Book October 5, 1997.. In the Spiritual Arena.. The Narrow Way of Orthodoxy.. Orthodoxy in Post-Modern Pluralistic Societies.. The Mission of the Orthodox Church in North America.. The Way of the Saint.. VLADIMIR LOSSKY:.. Theology and Mysticism in the Tradition of the Eastern Church.. by Vladimir Lossky.. METROPOLITAN ANTHONY (BLOOM) OF SOUROZH:.. I Believe in God.. by Metropolitan Anthony Bloom.. Meeting a Non-Orthodox Society.. The Whole Human Person: Body, Spirit and Soul.. The Mother of God.. On Death.. The  ...   Priesthood of Christ.. by Metropolitan Kallistos Ware.. Excerts from.. The Orthodox Church.. The Victory of Suffering Love.. FATHER THEODORE STYLIANOPOULOS:.. Orthodoxy: Standing in the Flames of the Spirit.. by Father Theodore Stylianopoulos.. LEWIS PATSAVOS, PH.. :.. The Canonical Tradition of the Orthodox Church.. by Lewis Patsavos, Ph.. FATHER STEVEN TSICHLIS:.. The Priesthood Belongs to Christ.. Dogma and Experience in Christian Life.. Children with Special Needs and the Orthodox Christian Family.. VIDEO RESOURCES:.. A HISTORY OF ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY (3 Part Series).. Part 1: Beginnings.. Our journey begins with the founding of the Church, the spread of Christianity to nations by the Apostles, the Gospel and the institution of Sacraments.. Part 2: Byzantium.. After the stabilization of the Church, the journey continues through the period of the Nicene Creed, Patristic Scriptures, Divine Liturgy and Icons.. During this same period, however, the official division of East and West is witnessed and concludes with a gradual rift in matters of faith, dogma, church customs, politics and culture.. Part 3: A Hidden Treasure.. The Church becomes the only institution perceived by Greeks as the preserver of their national identity during 400 years of Turkish rule.. By the end of the 19th century, a worldwide Orthodox community is born and the Church expands its influence to major social and philanthropic concerns.. The Fall of Constantinople:.. A video from the Christian Broadcasting Network.. The 60 Minutes interview with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.. 60 Minutes on Mt.. Behind the Scenes: 60 Minutes on Mt.. Metropolitan Kallistos Ware Speaks on Salvation..

    Original link path: /orthodoxy.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: Home.. Welcome Letter.. The Rudder - Internet Radio.. Visitor's Center.. Service Times.. Directions.. Calendar of Events.. Upcoming Events.. Greek Festival.. Search our Site.. Links.. Our Parish.. Parish History.. Parish Council.. Vision 21.. People.. Organizations and Leaders.. Serving Christ by Serving Others.. Photo Galleries.. Stewardship.. Endowment.. Our Faith.. Orthodoxy.. Scripture Verses to Live By.. Studying the Scriptures.. Iconography.. The Discipline of Prayer.. Ethics Moral Issues.. Ecumenical Dialogue.. Worship.. Orthodox Worship.. Choir.. Acolytes.. Marriage at St.. Preparing for Marriage.. An Explanation of the Service of Matrimony.. The Betrothal.. The Crowning.. Baptism at St.. 40-day Blessings at St.. Funerals at St.. Education.. Orthodox Christianity 101.. Bible Studies.. Orthodox Roman Catholic Bookclub.. Men's Fellowship.. Bookstore.. Library.. Ministries.. Philoptochos.. Missions and Outreach.. Mission is Possible - Tanzania.. Agape Outreach.. Hannah's Gift.. Ambassadors (Seniors).. Career Ministry.. Grief Ministry.. Alcoholics Anonymous.. Modern Greek (Adults).. Youth.. Church School.. GOYA.. Hunger Strike.. Children's Ministries (Pioneer Clubs).. Modern Greek (children).. Multimedia.. Sermons.. Retreats Seminars.. Podcasts.. Contact Us.. Saint Paul's Church School - Age 3 through 12th Grade.. Christmas Pageant 2013 Music.. Holy Icons - Seeing and Being.. (theme of 2013-14 Church School year).. But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord.. 2 Corinthians 3.. 18.. We Orthodox Christians see icons in our churches, in our homes, businesses, and even in our cars.. Seeing an icon is not a new concept, but this year in our Church School classes, we will focus on learning how to understand the icons that we see.. There s more to this year s theme than understanding what we see, though.. Genesis 1.. 26 and 27 tells us that we were created in the image (Gr.. eikon) of God, to be icons of God.. Being a holy icon means becoming  ...   Sunday, except: December 22, 2012, December 30, 2012, May 5, 2013 Holy Pascha (Easter) Sunday, and May 12, 2013 Godparent/Godchild Sunday.. Attendance awards are given in three categories: Perfect Attendance (0 absences), Exemplary Attendance (1-4 Absences) and Excellent Attendance (5-7 absences).. Students will be given up to 4 credits for attending another Orthodox Church in the Exemplary or Excellent categories only.. Please provide a note immediately upon returning to class.. ABOUT SAINT PAUL.. THE APOSTLE.. The Apolytikion or Hymn of St.. About Saint Paul.. - Primary Secondary Supplemental Lesson.. Family Workbook - St.. Paul's Journeys.. Christian Education Resources.. Christian Education: Nurturing the Faith.. an article by our Pastor, Father Steven Tsichlis.. Why Do We Have Family Worship at St.. Paul's?.. an article by our Executive Director, Eve Tibbs.. Click here for.. Printable Weekly Lessons.. on the Saints and weekly Gospel readings.. Religious Education Website of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco.. A Few Prayers to Teach Your Children.. GUARDIAN ANGEL.. O Angel of God, my holy Guardian given to me from Heaven, protect and enlighten me this day, give me strength to overcome temptations, and save me from all evil.. Teach me to do what is right, and guide me in the steps of Christ, my Savior.. ALL-HOLY TRINITY.. All-Holy Trinity, have mercy on us.. Lord, cleanse us from our sins.. Master, forgive our iniquities,.. Holy God, look upon our infirmities for Your Name's sake, and heal them.. A TABLE GRACE.. O Christ our God, bless the food and drink of your servants, for you are Holy always; now and ever, and unto ages of ages.. Amen.. HEAVENLY KING.. O heavenly King, the Comforter, the Spirit of Truth, Who art everywhere present and fills all things.. Treasury of Blessings and Giver of Life, come and abide in us and cleanse us from every impurity, and save our souls, O Good One..

    Original link path: /churchschool/index.html
    Open archive

  • Title:
    Descriptive info: WORSHIP, BEAUTY AND THE DESIRE FOR GOD.. Excepted from.. At the Corner of East and Now.. by Frederica Mathewes-Green.. Beauty is that which opens our eyes to the majesty of God and moves us to desire Him.. Worship is not just an intellectual grasping of truths but a process of falling in love.. Beauty opens us to adoration and a craving for God begins to take root.. Without this, our love for Him may be polite, respectful and even theologically accurate, but it lacks the headlong abandonment that should characterize a relationship between lover and beloved.. Modern American church architecture seldom shows regard for beauty; in fact, contemporary worship spaces often look like they ve been designed to be lecture or entertainment spaces.. Other important activities, like fellowship and education, have somehow invaded the time that should be set aside for falling down in awe before God.. Orthodox worship is quite elaborate, even voluptuous with beauty.. Extravagant but not formal, fancy but not fussy, our worship is like a big family Christmas dinner, with the best linens and finest dishes and everyone having a hearty time.. Worship was always meant to be gloriously, delightfully beautiful.. This was true even in the time of Moses.. Although His people were wandering the desert in tents, God commanded them to construct a tabernacle for worship that was staggeringly elaborate.. The directions given in the Book of Exodus require gold, silver, precious stones, blue and purple cloth, embroidery, incense, bells and anointing oil.. The pattern continues in the visions of the prophets, where God appears in glorious settings.. Isaiah sees Him high and lifted up, wearing a robe with a voluminous train, while soaring angels chant a hymn and the smoke of incense fills the Temple (Isaiah 6).. Daniel pictures the entrance of the Son of Man into the throne room of the Ancient of Days (Daniel 7:9-14).. In the last book of the Bible, St.. John has a vision of heavenly worship that includes precious stones, gold, thrones, crowns, white robes, crystal and incense (Revelation 4).. From the beginning to the end of Scripture, worship is accompanied by great beauty.. As a result,  ...   for You; in my ugliness I plunged into the beauties You had made.. You were with me but I was not with You.. You called, You cried out, You shattered my deafness, You flashed, You shone, You scattered my blindness.. You breathed perfume and I drew in my breath and I pant for You.. I tasted and I am hungry and thirsty.. You touched me and I burned for Your peace.. I drive carpool, write e-mail, read the paper, go to the mall, pop a tape in the VCR.. None of this matters; all of it could blow away overnight.. What does matter is this slim golden thread: the Liturgy that begins each Sunday morning in my church and reaches its fulfillment in the moment I receive communion.. Prayer spills backward and forward from that moment, wrapping me into union with God.. It s the work of a lifetime that stretches on beyond my earthly life.. This perspective is backward from the usual.. What happens in church is the most important thing; what happens in the rest of my life seems transient and contingent.. The Liturgy is whole and beautiful; the rest of my life seems random and bumpy.. When death strips away from me all the shreds of foolishness, self-indulgence, gossip and greed, this will remain, one of the few things to remain.. In the moment after communion, I press my lips against the chalice, a kiss of surrender, veneration and gratitude.. It is the one true centering moment of my oblivious cycling days and weeks.. On the chalice I see the face of Christ painted in enamel.. I look at Him and He looks at me.. The emotions I find prompted by walking the path Orthodoxy teaches are complex and hard to describe: the overwhelming and deliciously terrifying riptide of God s love; the rapturous joy of weeping over my sins; the sweet, stinging desire to bring others to see the beautiful face of Jesus.. We are and will be ourselves: redeemed, exulting and charged with light, fulfilling the task we were created for, destined and appointed to live for the praise of His glory (Ephesians 1:12).. Excepted from..

    Original link path: /beauty.html
    Open archive



  •  


    Archived pages: 101